attribute

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attribute

noun A term of art used in data modelling for a specific datum that can be collected for a class.

attribute

(ă-tri′būt″) [L., attribuere, to assign, ascribe]
1. To assign a cause.
2. To explain, e.g., a phenomenon or an event.
3. To predicate, e.g., a theory on a piece of evidence.

attribute

in statistics a qualitative variable which cannot be expressed in numerical terms, e.g. insectivorous as a behavioral attribute.
References in periodicals archive ?
This data also suggests that partisan opinions vary because of this ambiguity, but the fact that attributions are not explicitly measured limit our ability to make inferences about responsibility; thus, an original survey is necessary to clarify how people assign responsibility following a transition.
When it comes to making responsibility attributions for national conditions, group-serving partisan biases may assert themselves through motivated reasoning (Kunda 1990).
In general, the participants were somewhat more objective in their attributions than expected, so this was perhaps the clearest example of self-esteem recovery (or a coping technique) exhibited by the fans in this study (Wann & Schrader, 2000).
The only study identified in the literature that explored the concept of symptom attribution involved patients with stroke (Williams, Bruno, Rouch, & Marriott, 1997).
H1: Locus of causality will be related to job satisfaction with internal attributions leading to higher job satisfaction and external attributions leading to lower job satisfaction.
In these examples the verbs in the first attribution and the second are different (as was the case in our Akkadian text), and a pattern is established for this pair of verbs (a and b).
Nevertheless, we observed that the narrative sections of annual reports in Brazil are marked by the presence of significant levels of self-serving attributions.
Thus, it is likely that guilt feelings, internal attributions, and external attributions make independent contributions to negative adjustment outcomes following sexual coercion.
The educational expectations and the three types of achievement attributions of students were also used for predicting their achievements and growth rates.
In the actor-observer bias, actors make internal attributions for others' performance and external attributions for their own performance (Floyd, 2000; Jones and Nisbett, 1972).
In general, students rated their attributions for performance to a greater degree as something over which they had control as opposed to something over which they had little control (locus of causality).
While there is no universally accepted explanation for fundamental attribution errors, there are several hypotheses.