attitude


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attitude

 [at´ĭ-to̳d]
1. a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd),
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. social or clinical psychology a relatively stable and enduring predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

/at·ti·tude/ (at´ĭ-tldbomacd)
1. a position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body.
2. a pattern of mental views established by cumulative prior experience.

attitude

[at′ətyo̅o̅d, -to̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, aptitude, fitness
1 a body position or posture, particularly the fetal position in the uterus, as determined by the degree of flexion of the head and extremities.
2 (in psychiatry) any of the major integrative forces in the development of personality that gives consistency to an individual's behavior. Attitudes are cognitive in nature, formed through interactions with the environment. They reflect the person's innermost convictions about situations good or bad, right or wrong, desirable or undesirable.

attitude

Anatomy
The position and relation of the body and body parts to each other, i.e., posture.

Psychology
A mental disposition or mindset. Attitude is a tendency, based on one’s beliefs and experience, to react to events in certain ways and approach or avoid events that confirm or challenge personal values.

attitude

Psychology “…the tendency towards a mode of response, toward the object in question.” See Abstract attitude.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of acting.
3. psychology A predisposition to behave or react in a certain way toward people, objects, institutions, or issues.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a relatively enduring evaluative reaction to other individuals, situations or objects, which may be positive or negative. Typically defined as comprising affective cognitive and behavioural components.

at·ti·tude

(at'i-tūd)
1. Position of the body and limbs.
2. Manner of behavior.
[Mediev. L. aptitudo, fr. L. aptus, fit]

attitude

a posture or position of the body; in obstetrics, the relation of the various parts of the fetal body to one another. See also posture.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you've got a positive attitude, you'll see obstacles as interesting or even fun.
Upon knowing how much people (dis)like these specific things, the responses were then averaged together to calculate their dispositional attitude (i.
XY2's services (planning, strategy, social network monitoring, design, mobile services, e-commerce and interaction) to select Attitude clients in Sao Paulo.
Her philosophy can be generally positive or negative, resulting in either a positive or negative attitude.
Most literature assumes that an attitude is accessed from memory and represents a global assessment of the object under scrutiny.
This is consistent with Yamashita (2004), which investigated the reading attitude relationship between students' L1 and FL among college students.
A person with a positive attitude is more likely to achieve than one who is afraid to risk disappointment or who expects to fail.
One might question the effectiveness of a school counselor who possesses a negative attitude toward students with disabilities.
Several researchers have focused attention on how attitudes are measured and inherent researcher bias regarding attitude measurement toward disability (Antonak & Livneh, 2000; Wright, 1988).
It lurks in the mind's dark basement, secretly shaping our opinions, attitudes, and stereotypes.
It's not about how you look, it's about what you think, and winners will be short-listed on the basis of their attitude.