attenuation


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attenuation

 [ah-ten″u-a´shun]
1. the act of thinning or weakening.
2. the change in the virulence of a pathogenic microorganism induced by passage through another host species, decreasing its virulence for the native host and increasing it for the new host. This is the basis for the development of live vaccines.
3. the change in a beam of radiation as it passes through matter. The intensity of the electromagnetic radiation decreases as its depth of penetration increases.

at·ten·u·a·tion

(ă-ten'yū-ā'shŭn),
1. The act of attenuating.
2. Diminution of virulence in a strain of an organism, obtained through selection of variants that occur naturally or through experimental means.
3. Loss of energy of a beam of radiant, ultrasound, or other energy because of absorption, scattering, beam divergence, and other causes as the beam propagates through a medium.
4. Regulation of termination of transcription; involved in control of gene expression in specific tissues.

attenuation

/at·ten·u·a·tion/ (ah-ten″u-a´shun) the act of thinning or weakening, as (a) the alteration of virulence of a pathogenic microorganism by passage through another host species, decreasing the virulence of the organism for the native host and increasing it for the new host, or (b) the process by which a beam of radiation is reduced in energy when passed through tissue or other material.

attenuation

[əten′yo̅o̅·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, attenuare, to make thin
the process of reduction, such as the attenuation of an x-ray beam by reducing its intensity, the weakening of the degree of virulence of a disease organism, or culturing under unfavorable conditions. Attenuated bacteria are often used as vaccine agents.

attenuation

A generic term for a reduction or diminution of activity, intensity, power or virulence of a reaction or effect, or an organism’s ability to grow and/or multiply.
 
Homeopathy
A decrease of an absolute concentration of a homeopathic remedy by serial dilution; according to the law of the infinitesimal dose, the more the substance is attenuated (diluted), the greater its effect.

Imaging
The decrease in intensity of a beam by either absorption or scattering attenuation.
 
Molecular biology
The regulation of transcription termination by interfering with mRNA elongation, a process restricted to prokaryotes. Slowed translation through a regulatory region allows formation of an RNA 2º structure that promotes termination; attenuation requires coupled transcription and translation.
 
Microbiology
A decrease in virulence of a microorganism (e.g., that of bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been weakened by multiple (238) subcultures on a bile-glycerine medium). The resulting bacterium is immunogenic—i.e., capable of eliciting antibody formation—but non-virulent; live attenuated organisms are used to produce the poliomyelitis vaccine, but these may revert to a wild type.
 
Radiation biology
A process by which a beam of radiation decreases in intensity when passing through material due to absorption and scattering processes, leading to a decrease in flux density of the beam when projected through matter.

attenuation

A generic term for a reduction or diminution of activity, intensity, power, or virulence of a reaction, effect, or organisms ability to grow and/or multiply Microbiology ↓ virulence of a microorganism–eg, that of bacillus Calmette-Guerin–BCG, a strain of Mycobacterium bovis that has been weakened by multiple–238–subcultures on a bile-glycerine medium; the resulting bacterium is immunogenic, ie capable of eliciting antibody formation, but non-virulent; live attenuated organisms are used to produce the poliomyelitis vaccine but these may revert to a wild type Radiation biology A process by which a beam of radiation is ↓ in intensity when passing through material, due to absorption and scattering processes, leading to a ↓ in flux density of the beam when projected through matter

at·ten·u·a·tion

(ă-ten'yū-ā'shŭn)
1. The act of attenuating.
2. Diminution of virulence in a strain of an organism, obtained through selection of variants that occur naturally or through experimental means.
3. Loss of energy of a beam of radiant energy due to absorption, scattering, beam divergence, and other causes as the beam propagates through a medium.
4. Regulation of termination of transcription; involved in the control of gene expression in specific tissues.

attenuation

  1. the loss of virulence of a microbial pathogen so that although still alive, it is no longer pathogenic. In this state it is able to stimulate beneficial ANTIBODY production when used as a VACCINE. Various procedures are used to attenuate the virulence of a pathogen, e.g. the ageing of cultures, or the passing of the pathogen through an unnatural host. Examples of vaccines using attenuated viruses are the Sabin polio vaccine, RUBELLA vaccine, MEASLES vaccine and MUMPS vaccine.
  2. a regulatory process in some prokaryotic biosynthetic operons in which mRNA synthesis terminates at an ATTENUATOR.

attenuation

reduction or weakening

attenuation,

n 1. reduction in concentration.
2. decrease in the ability of a pathogenic organism to cause disease.

attenuation 

1. A reduction of intensity of a radiation as it passes through an absorbing or scattering medium.
2. Narrowing of a blood vessel.
3. See penalization.

attenuation (əten´yōōā´shən),

n 1. to make thinner, weaker, or less virulent.
2. the process by which a beam of radiation is reduced in energy when passing through some material.

attenuation

1. the act of thinning or weakening.
2. reduction in the virulence of a pathogenic microorganism induced by passage through another host species, decreasing its virulence for the native host and increasing it for the new host. Some attenuated strains of microorganisms may occur naturally. The possibility now exists of using genetic engineering to attenuate microorganisms in defined ways. Attenuated organisms are used as live vaccines. See also attenuated vaccine.
3. the change in a beam of radiation or sound beam as it passes through matter. The intensity of the electromagnetic radiation decreases as its depth of penetration increases. A sound beam becomes weaker as it travels through tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the single- and bipollutant models, an attenuation factor of [lambda] = 1 indicates no attenuation (i.
Acoustic properties of HDPE and PA6 measured at 230[degrees] Material Velocity (m/s) Attenuation (dB/cm) HDPE 1016 4.
The purported benefits of growth attenuation intervention are predicated on the following chain of events unfolding: high-dose estrogen causes bones to reach their final length quickly, shortening their final length and thus causing children so treated to be of shorter stature.
Determination of power-low attenuation coefficient and dispersion spectra in multi-wall carbon nanotube composites using Kramers-Kroning relations, in J.
The density was positively correlated with relative attenuation, regardless of the shape of the plants' leaves.
As with the veneer exhaust, the HAP attenuation for the press exhaust (Table 2) was better than the attenuation of total VOCs.
1 earthquake catalogue (Camasi and Stucchi, 1996), the seismogenic zonation published by Scandone (1997), and two intensity attenuation models (Grandori et al.
The introduction of CT-based attenuation correction and its integration with PET necessitates different PET/CT scanning protocols.
The authors note that the transmission bottlenecks could result in overall reduction in viral fitness if more fitness is lost during each transmission than is gained as viral diversity develops again in the person infected [1]--one possible mechanism for attenuation of HIV over time.
The high attenuation figures should be news to building designers, he adds.
2002) This will cause a decrease in shock attenuation when looking at the total amount of shock attenuated.
features state-of-the-art construction, highlighted by double thick sheet-rock and extra insulation for sound attenuation.