attending physician


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Related to attending physician: resident physician, Attending physician statement

physician

 [fĭ-zish´un]
an authorized practitioner of medicine, as one graduated from a college of medicine or osteopathy and licensed by the appropriate board; see also doctor.
attending physician one who attends a hospital at stated times to visit the patients and give directions as to their treatment.
emergency physician a specialist in emergency medicine.
family physician a medical specialist who plans and provides the comprehensive primary health care of all members of a family, regardless of age or sex, on a continuous basis. See also family practice.
resident physician a graduate and licensed physician learning a specialty through in-hospital training.

at·tend·ing phy·si·cian

1. physician responsible for the care of a patient;
2. physician supervising the care of patients by interns, residents, and/or medical students.

attending physician

Etymology: L, attendere, to stretch
the physician who is responsible for a particular patient. In a university hospital setting, an attending physician often also has teaching responsibilities, holds a faculty appointment, and supervises residents and medical students. Also called
Usage notes: (informal)
attending.

attending physician

Medspeak-US
The physician who is on the medical staff of a hospital or healthcare facility, and legally responsible for the care given to a particular patient while in the hospital. A patient’s attending physician is also regarded as a person’s private physician, if that physician cares for the person on an individual and/or outpatient basis.
 
Terminal care
The physician (or designee) who is primarily responsible for the care and treatment of the individual upon whom a declaration of brain death is to be made.

attending physician

Medical practice The physician who is on the medical staff of a hospital or health care facility, and legally responsible for the care given to a particular Pt while in the hospital. See Private physician Terminal care The physician–or designee who is primarily responsible for the care and treatment of the individual upon whom a declaration of brain death is to be madeSee Appropriate period of observation, Brain death, Corroborating physician.

at·tend·ing phy·sic·i·an

(ă-tend'ing fi-zish'ŭn)
The doctor formally and legally responsible for primary care and treatment throughout a stay in a health care facility.
References in periodicals archive ?
This direction is to the attending physician, who is responsible for determining the patient's condition.
The hospice nurse noticed that the wife had decreased the daily tube feedings to an amount less than the quantity prescribed by the attending physician in his written orders.
Once a referral is made, send both the patient and her attending physician a consent form allowing the team to interview and examine the patient.
To avoid claims that staff failed to inform an attending physician of a sentinel event, consider establishing "physician notification parameters" so the nursing staff knows how quickly they need to contact the attending physician.
The attending physician remembers the patient has a history of a non-functional heart murmur.
By using the term "recommended" dissenting viewpoints are not suppressed and the attending physician is free to follow his or her own conscience and medical judgment.
At bottom, the laboratory professional and the attending physician are necessary collaborators, each relying on the other for their special roles in patient care," says Donna M.
assistant professor of clinical medicine, attending physician, Division of Pulmonary Care, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
The government had alleged that Park should not have billed globally between 1985 and 1988 for Holter cardiac monitoring services when professional interpretations were performed by an attending physician.
If the attending physician did not respond (25 percent), the service chief/chair provided proactive counsel.
At times, the medical director may be called upon to provide that input or to contact an attending physician if the resident's status changes.
David Berkoff is an attending physician on staff at Duke University Medical Center.