attempt

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attempt

 [ah-tempt´]
a try or effort to achieve some goal.
suicide attempt a serious effort to commit suicide involving definite risk. The outcome frequently depends on circumstances alone and is not under the person's control.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sociodemographic differences between suicide attempters and nonattempters were examined using univariate analyses of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and chi-square analyses for nominal variables (see Table 1).
Young people are more likely to have living parents, who might be especially likely to provide aid to an attempter.
Clemons, founded and served as executive director of OASSIS, Organization for Attempters and Survivors of Suicide in Interfaith Services, is an ordained minister for the United Methodist Church and was named professor emeritus by Wesley Theological Seminary.
Nightmares and sleep disturbances in relation to suicidality in suicide attempters.
The mental health of the peers of suicide completers and attempters.
3, 2005, issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, Beck reported that "recent suicide attempters treated with cognitive therapy were 50 percent less likely to try to kill themselves again 18 months after their short-term treatment ended than those who did not receive the therapy.
This percentage of suicide attempters is believed to have some type of behavioral health disorder.
A genetic study has provided additional tentative evidence that gene variants of neuronal NOS (nNOS) are associated with suicide attempters while other gene variants of endothelial NOS (eNOS) may be "protective" from suicidal behavior.
For example, in a study of youth in a psychiatric hospital, Borst and Noam (1989) find that conduct disorders are the most prevalent type of disorders diagnosed among suicide attempters.
Third, a suicide awareness presentation to school staff should include, at a minimum, demographics of suicide attempters and completers, risk factors, referral information (King; Popenhagen & Qualley; Scouller & Smith), a clear conceptual base, proven instructional strategies, and attention to local school and community demographics (Kalafat, 2003).
Attempters were more likely to have mental health disorders, substance abuse disorders, a history of trauma or abuse, financial stress, and unstable social support compared to non-attempters.