attachment


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Related to attachment: attachment disorder

attachment

 [ah-tach´ment]
1. the development of strong affectional ties between an infant and a significant other (mother, father, sibling, caretaker); this is a psychological, rather than a biological, process.
2. the initial stage of infection of a cell by a virus, in which the viral envelope finds a suitable receptor on the cell surface, enabling the virus to enter. Called also adsorption.
risk for impaired parent/infant/child attachment a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as disruption of the interactive process between parent/significant other and infant that fosters the development of a protective and nurturing reciprocal relationship. Possible causes include inadequacy of the parent or parent substitute (such as anxiety or substance abuse), illness in the child, physical separation, lack of privacy, and others.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'ment),
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
3. In psychiatry and psychology, a concept encompassing the strength and style of connectedness in primate relationships.

attachment

Etymology: Fr, attachement
1 the state or quality of being affixed or attached.
2 (in psychiatry) a mode of behavior in which one individual relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another; a feeling of affection or loyalty that binds one person to another. See also bonding.
3 (in dentistry) any device, such as a retainer or artificial crown, used to secure a partial denture to a natural tooth in the mouth.
4 (in periodontology) the fixation of periodontal tissues to alveolar bone and tooth structure.

attachment

Informatics A file (e.g., in a .pdf, .jpg or other format) that is often sent with an email.
MedspeakUK A term of art for a specific post (job) within an educational programme.
Psychology A popular term for the emotional bond between people (e.g., infant with primary caregiver; parent with child; husband with wife) or any long-lasting bond that a person develops toward another person or object.

attachment

Psychiatry The behavior of an organism that relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another object which develops during critical periods of life and can be extinguished by lack of opportunity to relate; if separation occurs before maturation can provide for adaptive adjustment, personality deviation can occur

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. A connection of one part with another.
2. dentistry A mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.

attachment

an enlargement of the base of an algal THALLUS by which the plant is anchored to the SUBSTRATE.

at·tach·ment

(ă-tach'mĕnt)
1. In dentistry, a mechanical device for the fixation and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
2. A connection of one part with another.

attachment,

n 1. a fastener, connector, associated part.
n 2. a mechanical device for retention and stabilization of a dental prosthesis.
attachment, abnormal frenum
n the insertions of labial, buccal, or lingual frena capable of initiating or continuing periodontal disease, such as creating diastemata between teeth, limiting lip or tongue movement.
attachment, epithelial (EA),
n the epithelial-derived tissue device that connects the junctional epithelium to the tooth surface.
attachment, gingival,
n the fibrous attachment of the gingival tissues to the teeth.
attachment, intracoronal,
n (precision attachment, slotted attachment). See retainer, intracoronal.
attachment level, clinical (CAL),
n the amount of space between attached periodontal tissues and a fixed point, usually the cementoenamel junction. A measurement used to assess the stability of attachment as part of a periodontal maintenance program.
attachment loss,
attachment, migration of epithelial,
n the apical progression of the epithelial attachment along the tooth root.
attachment, orthodontic,
n a device, secured to the crown of a tooth, that serves as a means of attaching the arch wire to the tooth.
attachment, parallel,
n a prefabricated device for attaching a denture base to an abutment tooth. Retention is provided by friction between the parallel walls of the two parts of the attachment.
attachment, precision,
attachment, slotted,

attachment

1. state of being attached.
2. a connection which achieves attachment.

attachment plaque
an electron-dense coating of cell membranes in which intermediate filaments are embedded participating in the mechanism of holding cells together.
References in periodicals archive ?
Complaints to the commission also centered on Section 224's failure to give incumbent local exchange carriers (ILECs) the same pole attachment access rights that competitive local exchange carriers (CLECs) and cable television systems had.
The stable cutter body of the attachment has to hydraulic cylinders with speed valves to minimize cycle times.
Hutchinson says the past two years have been critical in the growth of hydraulic attachments sales because smaller contractors and processors are starting to use the tools.
In psychological terms, effective teachers establish and maintain secure attachment and ego-relatedness in support of their students' true self (Winnicott, 1965; Bowlby, 1969).
Using a built-in hydraulic "quick-hitch" developed by Kobelco (and under patent application), the attachment can be taken apart into six components.
By statute, rural electric cooperatives are specifically exempt from FCC pole attachment regulation but may be subject to state regulation if a state asserts jurisdiction.
Indeed, attachment to God has proven to be a useful predictor of a number of diverse outcomes including coping, body image and well-being (e.
There is both theological (Miner, 2007) and empirical (Kirkpatrick, 1999) evidence that Christian believers relate to God as an attachment figure.
Bowlby (6) outlines the 3 basic patterns of attachment that were first described by his protege and colleague Mary Ainsworth.
By utilizing an electronic attachment process with standards-based formatting, providers will reduce the amount of time it takes the payer to adjudicate claims, decreasing reimbursement time almost immediately.
John Bowlby first developed attachment theory in the 1960s based on observations of separation anxiety in children, he proposed that early experiences with caregivers are internalized and form enduring cognitive schemas of relationships that influence the type of interactions individuals will have with others and the interpretation of these interactions.