gingivitis

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gingivitis

 [jin″jĭ-vi´tis]
inflammation of the gums. Bleeding is a primary symptom, and other symptoms include swelling, redness, pain, and difficulty in chewing. Gingivitis can lead to the more serious disorder known as periodontitis. There are numerous causes, of which the primary one is pathogenic microorganisms in the crevices between the gums and the teeth. Other contributing factors are general poor health, host response to inflammation, hormonal imbalances, malnutrition, reactions to certain medications, irregular teeth, badly fitting fillings or dentures that irritate the gums, systemic disease, and infections such as herpetic gingivostomatitis. Gingivitis is best prevented by correct brushing and flossing of the teeth and proper oral hygiene. A good diet containing the necessary minerals and vitamins is also important. Vitamin deficiencies and anemia and other blood dyscrasias are often accompanied by gingivitis.
acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (ANUG) (acute ulcerative gingivitis) necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.
Dilantin gingivitis generalized hyperplasia of the gingiva, which may also rarely involve other areas of the oral mucosa, resulting in overgrowth of the fibrous tissue from the interaction of plaque accumulation with the anticonvulsive agent Dilantin (phenytoin).
necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) an inflammatory destructive disease of the gingivae that has a sudden onset with periods of remission and exacerbation. It is marked by ulcers of the gingival papillae that become covered by sloughed tissue and circumscribed by linear erythema. Fetid breath, increased salivation, and spontaneous gingival hemorrhage are additional features. It may extend to other parts of the oral mucosa, with lesions involving the palate or pharynx (see also vincent's angina). The etiology is uncertain, but many authorities believe it is caused by a bacterial complex in the presence of predisposing factors such as preexisting gingival disease, smoking, severe stress, radical changes in eating or sleeping patterns, or nutritional deficiency. It has also been associated with immunodeficiency conditions such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although the disease often occurs in an epidemic pattern, it has not been shown to be contagious. Called also acute necrotizing ulcerative or acute ulcerative gingivitis.
pregnancy gingivitis any of various gingival changes ranging from gingivitis to the so-called pregnancy tumor.
Vincent's gingivitis necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis),
Inflammation of the gingiva as a response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by erythema, edema, and fibrous enlargement of the gingiva without resorption of the underlying alveolar bone.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]

gingivitis

/gin·gi·vi·tis/ (-vi´tis) inflammation of the gingiva.
acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis  (ANUG), acute ulcerative gingivitis, acute ulceromembranous gingivitis necrotizing ulcerative g.
atrophic senile gingivitis  inflammation, and sometimes atrophy, of the gingival and oral mucosa in menopausal and postmenopausal women, believed due to altered estrogen metabolism.
fusospirochetal gingivitis  necrotizing ulcerative g.
herpetic gingivitis  infection of the gingivae by the herpes simplex virus.
necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis  trench mouth; a progressive painful infection, also seen in subacute and recurrent forms, marked by crateriform lesions of interdental papillae with pseudomembranous slough circumscribed by linear erythema; fetid breath; increased salivation; and spontaneous gingival hemorrhage; see also under gingivostomatitis.
pregnancy gingivitis  any of various gingival changes ranging from gingivitis to the so-called pregnancy tumor.
Vincent's gingivitis  necrotizing ulcerative g.

gingivitis

(jĭn′jə-vī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the gums, characterized by redness and swelling.

gingivitis

[jin′jivī′tis]
Etymology: L, gingiva + Gk, itis, inflammation
inflammation of the gingiva, with symptoms that may include redness, swelling, and bleeding. Gingivitis is generally the result of poor oral hygiene and of the accumulation of bacterial plaque on the teeth, but it may be a sign of other conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, leukemia, hormonal changes, or vitamin deficiency. It is common in pregnancy, is usually painless, and may be acute or chronic. Research is finding associations between the occurrence of periodontal disease and heart disease, stroke, asthma, and low birth weight neonates. Frequent removal of plaque and regular visits to the dentist or dental hygienist along with proper oral hygiene may help in prevention. Compare necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis.
observations This gum inflammation is usually painless in its early stages and manifests as redness, swelling, and bleeding of the gums. Halitosis and bluish gum discoloration may also be present. Complications include development of pus pockets and abscess formation and pain. Diagnosis is made on oral examination.
interventions Treatment is targeted at plaque removal and antibiotics for signs of infection. Soft tissue debridement may be indicated for chronic or severe cases.
nursing considerations Interventions should focus on education about appropriate oral hygiene (brushing, flossing, and gum massage) and regular dental care with professional teeth cleaning.
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Gingivitis

gingivitis

Oral surgery Inflammation of gingiva. See Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, Pregnancy gingivitis.

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis)
Inflammation of the gingiva with no apical migration of the junctional epithelium beyond the cementoenamel junction.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]

gingivitis

Inflammation of the gums. Gingivitis almost always implies neglect of dental hygiene with accumulation of PLAQUE around the necks of the teeth and the development of dental CALCULUS. There is inflammation and bleeding and, if the condition is neglected, damage to the PERIODONTAL MEMBRANE that secures the teeth in place. Gingivitis is also a feature of SCURVY.

gingivitis

inflammation of the gingiva or gums resulting from harmful bacteria triggering immune responses in the area around the teeth. Gingivitis is one of many periodontal diseases that affect the health of the periodontium (tissues surrounding the teeth including the gums, soft tissues and bone). The primary cause is Porphyromonas gingivalis, but other anaerobic bacteria and SPIROCHAETES may be involved. Normally, gingivitis results from an underlying illness or particular medication, such as steroid therapy, that renders the IMMUNE SYSTEM susceptible. Hormonal changes in the body during pregnancy and PUBERTY may also render gums vulnerable to bacterial infection. Whilst painful and unpleasant, the condition does not usually lead to TOOTH loss.

Gingivitis

Inflammation of the gums, seen as painless bleeding during brushing and flossing.
Mentioned in: Oral Hygiene

gingivitis,

n an inflammatory periodontal disease that affects the area within the oral cavity called the gingiva. Inflamed tissue in the gingival region, bleeding, and changes in contour are common symptoms. See also disease, periodontal.
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Gingivitis.

gin·gi·vi·tis

(jin'ji-vī'tis)
Inflammation of gingiva as a response to bacterial plaque on adjacent teeth; characterized by erythema, edema, and fibrous enlargement of the gingiva without resorption of the underlying alveolar bone.
[gingiva + G. -itis, inflammation]

gingivitis (jin´jivī´tis),

n an inflammation of the gingival tissue. A major classification of periodontal disease.
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Gingivitis.
gingivitis and malposed teeth,
n the malposition may predispose the gingivae to inflammation by permitting food impaction or impingement, by providing irregular spaces in which calculus may be deposited, and by making oral hygiene difficult.
gingivitis, bacteria in,
n the causative organisms in gingival inflammation. The common chronic forms of gingivitis, from a bacterial standpoint, are nonspecific, with the exception of acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis, in which there is an apparent specificity of the bacterial flora: the fusospirochetal organisms.
gingivitis, bismuth,
n a metallic poisoning caused by bismuth given for treatment of systemic disease; characterized by a dark, bluish line along the gingival margin.
gingivitis, chronic atrophic senile,
n gingival inflammation characterized by atrophy and areas of hyperkeratosis; found primarily in elderly women.
gingivitis, desquamative
n an inflammation of the gingivae characterized by a tendency of the surface epithelium to desquamate. The disease is a clinical entity, not a pathologic entity. It is most frequently associated with menopause but may be associated with biologic stress. Older term: gingivosis.
gingivitis, eruptive
n the gingival inflammation occurring at the time of eruption of the primary or permanent teeth.
gingivitis, fusospirochetal,
n See gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative.
gingivitis gravidarum,
n See gingivitis, pregnancy.
gingivitis, hemorrhagic,
n the gingivitis characterized by profuse bleeding, especially that associated with ascorbic acid deficiency or leukemia.
gingivitis, herpetic,
n an inflammation of the gingivae caused by herpesvirus. See also gingivostomatitis, herpetic.
gingivitis, hormonal,
n the gingivitis associated with endocrine imbalance, the endocrinopathy being modified, in most instances, by the influence of local environmental factors.
gingivitis, hyperplastic,
n the gingivitis characterized by proliferation of the various tissue elements. May be accompanied by dense infiltration of inflammatory cells.
gingivitis, idiopathic,
n a gingival inflammation of unknown causation.
gingivitis, infectious,
n a gingivitis not caused by plaque, but instead originating from bacteria, fungi, or viruses.
gingivitis, inflammatory cells in,
n the inflammatory cells are, for the most part, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and some histiocytes, because the gingival inflammatory process is usually chronic and progressive in nature. With acute exacerbations, polymorphonuclear leukocytes are also present.
gingivitis, marginal,
n an inflammation of the gingivae localized to the marginal gingivae and interdental papillae.
gingivitis, menstrual cycle associ-ated,
n gingival inflammation that occurs during ovulation as a result of hormone-level changes.
gingivitis, necrotizing ulcerative,
n (fusospirochetal gingivitis, NUG, trench oral cavity, ulcerative gingivitis, ulceromembranous gingivitis, Vin-cent's gingivitis, Vincent's infection) a form of necrotizing periodontal disease with an inflammation of the gingivae characterized by necrosis of the interdental papillae, ulceration of the gingival margins, the appearance of a pseudomembrane, pain, and a fetid odor.
n (uremic gingivitis, uremic stomatitis), a membrane form of stomatitis and gingivitis associated with a failure of kidney function. It is accompanied by pain, ammonia-like odor, and increased salivation.
gingivitis, non plaque-induced,
n a gingivitis caused by factors other than plaque, such as allergic reaction, dermatologic disease, a genetic condition, infectious agents, response to a foreign body, or physical trauma.
gingivitis, plaque-induced,
n a gingivitis caused by the accumulation of plaque.
gingivitis, pregnancy,
n (gingivitis gravidarum, hormonal gingivitis), an enlargement of hyperplasia of the gingivae resulting from a hormonal imbalance during pregnancy.
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Pregnancy gingivitis.
gingivitis, puberty,
n an enlargement of the gingival tissues as a result of an exaggerated response to irritation resulting from hormonal changes.
gingivitis, scorbutic,
n a gingivitis associated with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency.
gingivitis, systemic disease-induced,
n a gingivitis occurring as a complication of a systemic disease, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus or acute leukemia.
gingivitis, uremic,
n See gingivitis, nephritic.

gingivitis

a general term for inflammation of the gums, of which bleeding is one of the primary signs. Other signs include swelling, redness, pain and difficulty in chewing. There are numerous causes for this condition, and it can lead to a more serious disorder, periodontitis. One of the most common causes of gingivitis is the accumulation of food particles in the crevices between the gums and the teeth.

feline plasma cell gingivitis-pharyngitis, feline plasma cell-lymphocytic gingivitis-pharyngitis
a chronic inflammatory disease of the mouth in cats, characterized by proliferative and ulcerative lesions of the gums and palatine fossa. There is often anorexia and a fetid odor to the breath. The cause is unknown.
necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis
a gingival infection marked by redness and swelling, necrosis, pain, hemorrhage, a necrotic odor and often a pseudomembrane. Extension to the oral mucosa is called necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis.