atrioventricular canal defect


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atrioventricular canal defect

Cardiology A VSD located near the junction of the mitral and tricuspid valves. See Congenital heart disease, Ventricular septal defect.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patient 2 had an atrioventricular canal defect, which was closed at age 5 years.
Atrioventricular Valve Regurgitation in Fetuses with Atrioventricular Canal Defects does not Progress During Mid- to Late Pregnancy for Most Babies Atrioventricular valve regurgitation (AVVR) influences morbidity and mortality in patients with atrioventricular canal defect (AVC).
Patients with right atrial isomerism have also frequently some anomalies like complete atrioventricular canal defect, transposition of the great arteries and double outlet right ventricle.
I have watched the close-up video of our cardiac surgeons repairing a complex atrioventricular canal defect.
In addition to the situs inversus totalis, a complete right-to-left reversal of the thoracic and abdominal organs, and her heart being on the right side of her chest, a condition known as dextrocardia, Isabelle's heart has at least seven severe defects, including: transposition of the great arteries; the pulmonary stenosis that keeps her heart from pumping enough blood; and atrioventricular canal defect, a condition that includes her having a large hole in the center of her heart.
Bradley has Down syndrome and underwent heart surgery at 6 months of age to correct an atrioventricular canal defect.
The presence of an atrioventricular canal defect (AV) was defined as "complete" if a single common atrioventricular valve was present, and "partial" if both atrioventricular valves (mitral and tricuspid) were seen with either a primum atrial septal defect, an inlet ventricular septal defect or a cleft anterior leaflet of the mitral valve.
Atrioventricular canal defect is the most common single congenital cardiac malformation in most countries and especially in the United States of America and Europe (2).
Among patients with severe ACHD--that is, those with univentricular heart, atrioventricular canal defects, tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, or transposition of the great arteries--the lifetime risk of atrial arrhythmia was 60%.
The abnormalities most commonly found on prenatal ultrasound examination are atrioventricular canal defects and hypoplastic ventricles.
Postoperative complete heart block is often seen with operations involving the interventricular septum such as ventricular septal defects and atrioventricular canal defects.

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