atrial tachycardia


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Related to atrial tachycardia: atrial flutter, Ventricular tachycardia, Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia

tachycardia

 [tak″e-kahr´de-ah]
abnormally rapid heart rate, usually taken to be over 100 beats per minute. adj., adj tachycar´diac.
A, Sinus tachycardia; B, Ventricular tachycardia. From Chernecky, 2001.
antidromic circus movement tachycardia a supraventricular tachycardia supported by a reentry circuit that uses the atrioventricular node in the retrograde direction and an accessory pathway in the anterograde direction; this produces a broad QRS rhythm indistinguishable from ventricular tachycardia. Such a tachycardia may also use two accessory pathways (one anterograde and one retrograde) and not involve the AV node at all.
atrial tachycardia a rapid heart rate, between 140 and 250 beats per minute, with the ectopic focus in the atria and with no participation by the atrioventricular node or the sinoatrial node. It is recognizable on the electrocardiogram because the P wave precedes the QRS complex, as opposed to being merged with it or following it. This condition is usually associated with atrioventricular block or digitalis toxicity.
benign ventricular tachycardia tachycardia originating in the ventricles, not associated with structural heart disease or significant hemodynamic symptoms.
bidirectional ventricular tachycardia (bifascicular ventricular tachycardia) a ventricular arrhythmia characterized by heart rates of 90 to 160 beats per minute, alternating right and left axis deviation, ectopic focus that alternates between the anterior superior and posterior inferior fascicles, and a right bundle branch block pattern in lead V1; seen in digitalis toxicity and other conditions.
chaotic atrial tachycardia an ectopic atrial tachycardia due to multifocal activity, characterized by at least three different shapes of P waves on the electrocardiogram; often associated with chronic obstructive lung disease.
circus movement tachycardia (CMT) a reentry circuit that uses an accessory pathway or pathways; there are two subtypes, antidromic and orthodromic circus movement tachycardia.
ectopic tachycardia rapid heart action in response to impulses arising outside the sinoatrial node.
junctional tachycardia rhythm at the rate of 100 to 140 beats per minute that arises in response to impulses originating in the atrioventricular junction, i.e., the atrioventricular node. It is often seen with digitalis toxicity and is due to triggered activity, but it may also be due to altered automaticity. In the case of digitalis toxicity, the term may be used to encompass the entire span of junctional rates with this condition, i.e., approximately 70 to 140 beats per minute.
monomorphic ventricular tachycardia a type that has a uniform beat-to-beat QRS morphology.
nonsustained ventricular tachycardia a type that terminates spontaneously within 30 seconds and does not lead to hemodynamic collapse.
orthodromic circus movement tachycardia a supraventricular tachycardia supported by a reentry circuit that uses the atrioventricular node in the anterograde direction and an accessory pathway in the retrograde direction, producing a narrow QRS complex.
orthostatic tachycardia disproportionate rapidity of the heart rate on arising from a reclining to a standing position.
paroxysmal tachycardia rapid heart action that starts and stops abruptly.
paroxysmal atrial tachycardia paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.
paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) a narrow QRS tachycardia that begins and ends abruptly; it may be terminated with a vagal maneuver. It has two common mechanisms, atrioventricular nodal reentry and circus movement that uses the atrioventricular node anterogradely and an accessory pathway retrogradely. On the electrocardiogram it is characterized by abrupt onset, and mechanisms are differentiated by the relation of the P wave to the QRS complex.
polymorphic ventricular tachycardia a type that has a constantly, and sometimes subtly, changing beat-to-beat QRS configuration.
potentially malignant ventricular tachycardia a type that is not associated with structural heart disease or hemodynamically important cardiac symptoms but is sometimes associated with left ventricular dysfunction.
sinus tachycardia (ST) a rapid rhythm originating in the sinoatrial node with a rate of usually 100 to 160 beats per minute; conduction through the ventricles is normal. During exercise or stress this is normal, but if it occurs during rest it is abnormal.
supraventricular tachycardia a combination of junctional tachycardia and atrial tachycardia.
sustained ventricular tachycardia tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds and leads to hemodynamic collapse.
ventricular tachycardia an abnormally rapid ventricular rhythm with aberrant ventricular excitation, characterized by at least three consecutive ventricular complexes of more than 100 beats per minute. It is generated within the ventricle and is most often associated with atrioventricular dissociation.

a·tri·al tach·y·car·di·a

paroxysmal tachycardia originating in an ectopic focus in the atrium.

atrial tachycardia

Etymology: L, atrium, hall; Gk, tachys, quick, kardia, heart
rapid beating of the atria caused by abnormal automaticity, triggered activity, or intraatrial reentry. The atrial rate is usually less than 200/min; however, in cases of digitalis excess, the rate increases gradually to 130/min to 250/min as the digitalis is continued. When there is 2:1 conduction, the atrial rhythm is irregular in 50% of cases. The contour of the P waves is different from that of the sinus P wave except in cases of digitalis-induced atrial tachycardia, when the P wave is almost identical to the sinus P wave. Vagal maneuvers have no effect on atrial tachycardia, although they do cause atrioventricular block. Atrial tachycardia may be either nonparoxysmal (common) or paroxysmal (uncommon). Also called auricular tachycardia.

atrial tachycardia

Cardiology Tachycardia triggered by a focus in the atrium, which beats at 160 to 190 bpm. See Atrial fibrillation, Atrial flutter.

a·tri·al tach·y·car·dia

(AT) (ātrē-ăl tak-i-kahrdē-ă)
Paroxysmal tachycardia originating in an ectopic focus in the atrium.

tachycardia

abnormally rapid heart rate.

atrial tachycardia
rapid contraction of the atrium arising from an ectopic focus in the atrium. The heart rate remains normal.
ectopic tachycardia
rapid heart action in response to impulses arising outside the sinoatrial node.
idioventricular tachycardia
one occurring as a compensation for a sinus bradycardia and A-V block.
junctional tachycardia
that arising in response to impulses originating in the atrioventricular junction, i.e. the atrioventricular node.
orthostatic tachycardia
disproportionate rapidity of the heart rate on arising from a recumbent to a standing position.
paroxysmal tachycardia
episodes of an abrupt and marked increase in heart rate in a resting patient, with an equally sudden return to normal.
sinus tachycardia, simple tachycardia
an increase in heart rate from heightened activity of the sinoatrial node, such as occurs with excitement or pain.
Enlarge picture
Sinus tachycardia in a dog.By permission from Ettinger SJ, Feldman E, Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Saunders, 2004
supraventricular tachycardia
a combination of junctional tachycardia and atrial tachycardia.
ventricular tachycardia
see ventricular tachycardia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Activation mapping during focal atrial tachycardia attacks (tachycardia cycle length 320 ms) showed earliest atrial activation in the upper left region of the right atrial septum.
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Current[R] Plus and Promote[R] Plus devices - the Current Plus implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and Promote Plus cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) offer new alert features for atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation, and are available with the new SJ4 connector system that is designed to simplify implant procedures.
Arrhythmias that can be mapped include, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, focal and ischemic ventricular tachycardia, AV nodal reentry tachycardia, and accessory pathway induced tachycardia.
In the right atrial application cleared by the FDA, electrophysiologists use the system to locate various types of atrial arrhythmias, including atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter and AV node reentry, so that they can treat these clinical arrhythmias.
The state-of-the-art diagnostics in the Identity ADx pacemaker detect and track episodes of atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation, generating six-month trend graphs to help physicians better manage atrial high rate events," said Eric S.
Right atrial use of Endocardial Solutions' EnSite 3000(TM) System applies to the diagnosis of several kinds of irregular heartbeats including atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter and AV node reentry.