atrial myxoma


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a·tri·al myx·o·ma

a primary cardiac neoplasm arising most commonly in the left atrium as a soft polypoid mucinous mass attached by a stalk to the atrial septum; it may resemble an organized mural thrombus. The symptoms may include cardiac murmurs, which change with alteration of body position and signs of mitral stenosis or insufficiency, with continuous danger of embolism by fragments of the tumor or its entire mass.

atrial myxoma

a benign, pedunculated, gelatinous tumor that originates in the interatrial septum of the heart. The tumor is characterized by palpitations, disseminated neuritis, nausea, weight loss, fatigue, dyspnea, fever, and occasional sudden loss of consciousness. It is treated by surgical removal of the tumor.
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Left atrial myxoma

atrial myxoma

The most common of the rare, primary cardiac neoplasms.

Clinical findings
Symptoms may be obstructive (right-sided congestion), ± ascites, constitutional (fever, fatigue, arthralgias, myalgias, weight loss), Raynaud’s phenomenon, skin rash, clubbing of digits; related to embolism—shortness of breath, orthopnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea, fainting, palpitations, dizziness and syncope, pleuritic chest pain, haemoptysis. Age of onset 25–55.

Diagnosis
2-D, transoesophageal echocardiography.
 
Management
Excision.
 
Prognosis
Excellent after excision.

atrial myxoma

Cardiology The most common 1º cardiac neoplasm, age of onset 25-55 Clinical Symptoms may be obstructive–right-sided congestion—most are right-sided, ± ascites, constitutional–fever, fatigue, arthralgias, myalgias, weight loss, Raynaud's phenomenon, skin rash, clubbing of digits, and related to embolism–SOB, orthopnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, fainting, palpitations, dizziness and syncope, pleuritic chest pain, hemoptysis Diagnosis 2-D, transesophageal echocardiography Management Excision Prognosis Excellent after excision
References in periodicals archive ?
Other differential diagnoses should include atrial myxoma,[sup][2] a gradually growing cardiac tumor, and hydatidosis,[sup][3] which would be supported by the presence of hydatid cysts in lungs and liver and positive serologic tests.
It was open heart surgery for an atrial myxoma, which is a benign growth within one of the chambers of the heart called the atrium.
The lump moved with the heartbeat, especially the left atrial myxoma moves towards left ventricle during diastole through mitral valve and returned to left atrium during systole.
2-4) Other possible causes of mitral regurgitation in a patient with a left atrial myxoma are tumor prolapse causing volume overload and leading to left atrial and left ventricular dilatation and annular dilatation and possible mechanical trauma to the mitral valve leaflets.
We present a very rare case of uterine fibroids going into the heart, which was diagnosed as right atrial myxoma on echocardiography.
We report an interesting case of a patient presenting with a constellation of symptoms and signs, all of which may be attributable to an underlying left atrial myxoma.
Detection of atypical right atrial myxoma by echocardiography.
Leading causes of classic pyrexia of unknown origin Infection Neoplasms Tuberculosis Lymphoma Occult bacterial abscess Renal carcinoma Endocarditis Atrial myxoma Brucellosis Infection Connective tissue Tuberculosis Still's disease Occult bacterial abscess Variants of rheumatoid arthritis Endocarditis Systemic lupus erythematosus Brucellosis Temporal arteritis Polymyalgia rheumatica Infection Other (geographical) Tuberculosis Familial Mediterranean fever Occult bacterial abscess Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease Endocarditis Melioidosis Brucellosis Pyrexia of unknown origin defined as temperature >38.
Other causes are carcinoid syndrome, left atrial myxoma, severe mitral annular calcification, thrombus formation, cor triatriatum, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and congenital mitral stenosis.
The seriousness of the tumour - a left atrial myxoma - meant she was immediately referred to Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital.
Cutaneous myxomas usually form a part of syndromes like NAME syndrome (nevi, atrial myxoma, myxoid neurofibromata and ephelides) and the LAMB syndrome (lentigines, atrial myxoma, mucocutaneous myxoma, and blue nevi).

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