atomism


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Related to atomism: logical atomism

at·om·ism

(at'ŏm-izm),
The approach to the study of a psychological phenomenon through analysis of the elementary parts of which it is assumed to be composed. Compare: holism.

atomism

A term of uncertain utility for the analysis of the individual components of psychological phenomena.
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And in his 1924 article, "Logical Atomism", Russell cites his 1905 theory of definite descriptions as a prime example of logical atomism.
For instance, they realized that acceptance of atomism entails rejection of Euclidean geometry and affirmation of discontinuous or discrete geometry.
In their "Introduction" to A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma, (60) the most extensive canonical account of Buddhist atomism, Dhamma and Bodhi state:
An actuarial approach enacts the philosophical positions of atomism and objectivism, seeking to predict human behavior through the application of mathematics to lived events.
Atomism is thus replaced not with an abstract collective but a direct and fluid association of persons, or a collective praxis.
As Christopher Meinel has argued, "there was no experimental proof possible" for an atomic theory of matter until the nineteenth century, and as Thomas Kuhn suggests, "Boyle's constructive attempt to replace existing theories of the elements by a conceptual scheme derived from the prevalent metaphysical atomism of the seventeenth century was a failure" (17) Bruno Latour has emphasized the "work of retrofitting that situates a more recent event"--such as experimental evidence for the existence of atoms--"as what 'lies beneath' an older one"--the speculative atomism of the seventeenth century.
An even more intellectually astute Caravaggio emerges under the mature scrutiny of Elizabeth Cropper's deepening insights into the artist's ties to the controversial tendency of the period know as atomism, taken to special advantage by Caravaggio given his well-documented relationship to the real.
He further argues that the mechanical philosophy, the origins of which have usually been traced to the recovery of Greek atomism, had roots in alchemical practice.
Yet in its spectrum of approaches that range from historical atomism to narrative, this volume also embodies a self critique, a critique that is of traditional Liszt studies, in its survey of method.
Markets and even the much-maligned corporations encourage friendships wider and deeper than the atomism of a full-blown socialist regime or the claustrophobic, murderous atmosphere of a 'traditional' village.
The four articles are striving toward this with their discussions of "hermeneutical" methods and the need to go beyond individualism or atomism (the "punctual" self) in understanding human life.
Modern science is typically thought by many contemporary scientists to have begun ex nihilo with the rejection of medieval Aristotelian natural philosophy in the 17th century, the rise of atomism, and the innovations of Galileo that placed the new scientific world-view on a more precise mathematical footing.