atmosphere


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atmosphere

 [at´mos-fēr]
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place. adj., atmospher´ic.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr),
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere, torr.
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

/at·mos·phere/ (at´mos-fēr)
1. the entire gaseous envelope surrounding the earth and subject to the earth's gravitational field.
2. the air or climate in a particular place.
3. a unit of pressure, being that exerted by the earth's atmosphere at sea level; equal to 1.01325 × 105pascals (approximately 760 mm Hg). Abbreviated atm.

atmosphere (atm)

[at′məsfir]
Etymology: Gk. atmos, vapor, sphaira, sphere
1 the natural body of air covers the surface of the earth. It is composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 1% argon and other gases, including small amounts of carbon dioxide hydrogen, and ozone as well as traces of helium, krypton, neon, and xenon and varying amounts of water vapor.
2 an envelope of gas, which may or may not duplicate the natural atmosphere in chemical components.
3 a unit of gas pressure that is usually defined as being equivalent to the average pressure of the earth's atmosphere at sea level, or about 14.7 pounds per square inch or 760 mm Hg. atmospheric, adj.

at·mos·phere

(at'mŏs-fēr)
1. Any gas surrounding a given body; a gaseous medium.
2. A unit of air pressure equal to 101.325 kPa.
See also: standard atmosphere
[atmo- + G. sphaira, sphere]

atmosphere

the gaseous envelope surrounding a particular body such as the earth, or the gaseous content of a given structure or container.

Atmosphere

A measurement of pressure. One atmosphere equals the pressure of air at sea level (14.7 pounds per square inch [psi]).

atmosphere (atm),

n the natural body of air, composed of approximately 20% oxygen, 78% nitrogen, and 2% carbon dioxide and other gases.
References in periodicals archive ?
Griffero develops Merleau-Ponty's idea of atmosphere as an always present field of meanings, each of which is largely anonymous and irreducible to personal perception, and thus spread out in the world as a set of variations open to all perceiving subjects.
Paul Mahaffy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, said that as atmosphere was lost, the signature of the process was embedded in the isotopic ratio.
The point-to-point effect, in practical terms, is the passage of a static electrical charge from a cathode electrode to an anode electrode in an open atmosphere, i.
They are injected into the fabric of our atmosphere as ribbons of varying concentrations and volumes.
To orbit around Earth, Neptune's rocket fuel will need to boost the craft 297 -- into Earth's atmosphere.
The desirable properties that are enhanced when larger castings are produced apply the enhanced "cushion theory," reducing atmosphere and the development of oolitic layers on the molding sand rapidly.
2], then that means reactive nitrogen is accumulating in the environment, in the atmosphere, in the groundwater, in the soils, in the biota.
It makes the picture of interactions in the upper atmosphere much more rich and complex than we previous thought.
Clearly structured throughout, the book demonstrates that the atmosphere and ocean are both subject to the influence of the earth's rotation and therefore they have a common dynamical basis.
The scientists found unexpectedly large amounts of methane in the atmosphere, and also discovered that the atmosphere is hotter than the surface by about 40 degrees, although it still only reaches a frigid minus 180 degrees Celsius.
Recent studies suggest that the electric fields in dust devils on the Red Planet are strong enough to cause chemical changes in the atmosphere there, including the creation of hydrogen peroxide.