athletic identity

athletic identity

the degree to which a person identifies with an athletic role as part of their self-concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consistent with the notion that self-identity may be hierarchical (Marsh & Craven, 2006), athletic identity may have subcomponents, including self-referent aspects of athleticism and social aspects of athleticism (Martin, Eklund, & Mushett, 1997; Martin, Mushett & Eklund, 1994).
Conceived under the watchful eye of Kia's president and chief design officer Peter Schreyer, with modern and instantly recognizable design cues, the Optima maintains its athletic identity but rides on a chassis that is longer, wider and stiffer.
Through e-mail, he was sent the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale-Plus (3, 4); his score of 1660 confirmed the importance of powerlifting in his life, as high scores for athletic identity range from 1467 to 2200.
If so, how can race organizers use participant's athletic identity measures when soliciting sponsors in the selection and/or evaluation process?
The study concludes that Indigenous Australian sportsmen face complex postsport challenges due to (a) the primacy of their athletic identity, (b) assumptions about their 'natural' acumen as athletes, (c) the impact of racialised stereotypes, and (d) profound commitments to extended families and communities.
This is an innovative athletic identity that honors Lynn University's legacy of winning on the field and in the classroom," Athletic Director Kristen Migliano said.
The experiment described here tests whether stereotype threat appears to contribute to the academic underperformance of college student-athletes by implementing a conventional stereotype-threat experiment but with the distinction that an athletic identity, rather than identities related to race or gender, is primed.
One of those reasons is you identify yourself, in my example, as a Cork hurler and your athletic identity.
For example, athletic identity, which is the degree to which the individual identifies herself with the athletic role (Brewer, Van Raalte, & Linder, 1993), is usually an important resource for an athlete at the peak of the career, but it can become a barrier in the process of adaptation to the post-career.
This section describes the following major themes which illustrate the collective experiences of co-participants highlighting this transformation: (a) accepting social stereotypes of motherhood, (b) resisting social stereotypes of motherhood, and (c) negotiating a new athletic identity.
Psychosocial factors that can affect child and adolescent athletes before and after an injury include athletic identity, body image, and life stressors, such as a parent's divorce.
In a second study, based this time on elite young athletes who were part of the ACE program and non-athletes of comparable age, Albion and Fogarty (2005) reported that scores on the CDDQ Difficulties section were associated with scores on the Athletic Identity Measurement Scale (AIMS) (Brewer, VanRaalte, & Linder, 1993) with high scorers on the AIMS more likely to experience career decision-making difficulties.