athlete's heart


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ath·lete's heart

a loose designation for cardiac findings in healthy athletes that would be or could be abnormal in patients with disease, including atrioventricular blocks, left ventricular hypertrophy and, sometimes, benign arrhythmias and atrioventricular blocks.

athlete's heart

[ath′lēts]
an enlarged but otherwise normal heart of an athlete trained for endurance. It is characterized by a low heart rate, an increased pumping capacity, and a greater ability to deliver oxygen to skeletal muscles. It may sometimes be confused with left ventricular hypertrophy. Also called athletic heart syndrome (AHS).

athlete's heart

Athletic heart syndrome Sports medicine A heart typical of trained athletes, and characterized by ↑ left ventricular diastolic volume and ↑ thickness of the left ventricular wall, as seen by 2-D echocardiography; arrhythmias seen in athletes' hearts are usually benign and include sinus bradycardia, wandering pacemaker, cardiac blocks, nodal rhythm, atrial fibrillation, ST segment and T-wave changes, ↑ P wave amplitude, right ventricular hypertrophy. See Sudden unexplained nocturnal death.

ath·lete's heart

(ath'lēts hahrt)
Nonpathologic enlarged heart in athletes reflecting specific adaptation to prolonged training. Manifestations in response to resistance training are thickened left ventricular wall and concentric hypertrophy, and in response to endurance training include enlarged left ventricular cavity and eccentric hypertrophy.
See: hypertrophy

athlete's heart

hypertrophy of the muscle of the left ventricle as a physiological response to training, especially endurance training. It is not considered to be pathological. Results in slowing of heart rate and changes characteristic of hypertrophy in the electrocardiogram (ECG).
References in periodicals archive ?
There are two important ECG changes that are specific to HCM, which may assist in the differentiation between athlete's heart syndrome and HCM.
Caption: Figure 3: Clinical criteria used to help differentiate athlete's heart from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in individuals with borderline abnormalities.
Recently, an easily measured tissue Doppler index was proposed as a potentially useful method for distinguishing athlete's heart from structural heart disease (49, 50).
The one fact in the description of the athlete's heart that has not changed is that the utmost important factor in preventing cardiovascular events, especially sudden cardiac death, is the appropriateness evaluations.
Insights into methods for distinguishing athlete's heart from structural heart disease, with particular emphasis on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Distinguishing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy from athlete's heart physiological remodeling: clinical significance, diagnostic strategies and implications for preparticipation screening.
An agreement about the athlete's heart as a physiological phenomenon exists (Akova et al.
The aim of this paper was to review and discuss the echocardiographic differentiation criteria in diagnosis between athlete's heart and inherited cardiac disease, mainly hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
Transthoracic two-dimensional M-mode and Doppler echocardiography has made substantial contribution and revealed itself as a useful non-invasive tool for differentiating the extreme phenotypes of physiological athlete's heart from cardiac pathology, particularly HCM, which manifests with both structural alterations and malfunctioning (Maron, 2005; Pelliccia et al.
The discrimination between benign athlete's heart and pathological cardiac hypertrophy is obviously important: in addition to the undisputed significance to the individual, the differentiation and subsequent measures are also important because the unnecessary furor drawn by a sports-related sudden cardiac death following a serious condition overlooked may serve as a deterrent from exercise for the general population.
It is well known that EF is well preserved in athletes; however to conduct an assessment of intrinsic myocardial performance on the athlete's heart using invasive measures is not practical considering the risk it would pose for the athlete.