athetosis


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Related to athetosis: dystonia, Pupillary athetosis

athetosis

 [ath″ĕ-to´sis]
repetitive involuntary, slow, sinuous, writhing movements.
 Positions of fingers in movements of athetosis. From Dorland's, 2000.

ath·e·to·sis

(ath'ĕ-tō'sis),
A condition in which there is a constant succession of slow, writhing, involuntary movements of flexion, extension, pronation, and supination of the fingers and hands, and sometimes of the toes and feet. Usually caused by an extrapyramidal lesion.
[G. athetos, without position or place]

athetosis

/ath·e·to·sis/ (ath″ĕ-to´sis) repetitive involuntary, slow, sinuous, writhing movements, especially severe in the hands.
Enlarge picture
Positions of fingers in movements of athetosis.

athetosis

(ăth′ĭ-tō′sĭs)
n.
A constant succession of slow, writhing, involuntary movements of flexion, extension, pronation, and supination of fingers and hands, and sometimes of toes and feet.

ath′e·toid′, ath′e·to′sic (-tŏt′ĭk), ath′e·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

athetosis

[ath′ətō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, athetos, not fixed
slow, writhing, continuous, and involuntary movement of the extremities, as seen in some forms of cerebral palsy and in motor disorders resulting from lesions in the basal ganglia, tabes dorsalis, or other conditions.

athetosis

Slow, uncoordinated, involuntary writhing movements (most severe in the fingers, hands, arms, legs and neck), difficulty feeding, hypotonia and spasms; athetosis may be accompanied by cerebral palsy.

Aetiology
Lesions in the brain, especially the corpus striatum, due to neonatal jaundice (kernicterus), asphyxia and thalamic stroke.

Management
Most pharmacologic agents (e.g., haloperidol, diazepam, curare and others) are ineffective.

athetosis

Mobile spasm Neurology Constant, slow involuntary writhing movements, most severe in hands; A CNS disorder characterized by continual uncoordinated movements of the limbs

ath·e·to·sis

(ath'ĕ-tō'sis)
Slow, writhing, snakelike involuntary movements involving flexion, extension, pronation, and supination of the fingers and hands, and sometimes of the toes and feet as well. Usually caused by an extrapyramidal lesion.
See also: choreathetosis, chorea, dyskinesia, cerebral palsy
Synonym(s): Hammond disease.
[G. athetos, without position or place]

athetosis

A neurological disorder featuring involuntary, slow writhing movements of the hands, arms, face and tongue caused by a form of CEREBRAL PALSY. The commonest causes are ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS from rhesus incompatibility and brain lack of oxygen during birth. Intelligence may be unaffected but there is usually severe speech difficulty and the appearance suggests mental retardation to the observer. Seizures are common.

Athetosis

A condition marked by slow, writhing, involuntary muscle movements.

Hammond,

William A., U.S. neurologist, 1828-1900.
Hammond disease - a condition in which there is a constant succession of involuntary movements of the fingers and hands, and sometimes of the toes and feet. Synonym(s): athetosis

athetosis

slow, rhythmic, writhing movements, involuntary flexion and extension, pronation, and supination of fingers/hands, and sometimes legs/feet, characteristic of some neurological diseases

ath·e·to·sis

(ath'ĕ-tō'sis)
A condition involving a constant succession of slow, writhing, involuntary movements of flexion, extension, pronation, and supination of the fingers and hands, and sometimes of the toes and feet.
[G. athetos, without position or place]

athetosis (ath´ətō´sis),

n a neuromuscular impairment in which extensive twisting and swaying spasms of the skeletal musculature interfere with voluntary control of movement; the spasms are especially conspicuous and disconcerting during emotional stress and on initiation of conscious voluntary acts.

athetosis

repetitive involuntary, slow, sinuous, writhing movements. Seen in primates, but not a feature of neurological disorders in domestic animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
For about one third of children who have athetosis and chorea, oral medications such as baclofen, clonazepam, diazepam and propanolol are helpful.
It is important to note that a rhizotomy will relieve spasticity but not improve contractures that are already present, nor is it an effective treatment for dystonia, athetosis or chorea.
Dystonia, athetosis and chorea are seen in children with basal ganglia problems.
Motor Problem Site of Injury Spasticity Upper motor neuron (UMN) Dystonia, Athetosis, Ballismus Deep motor neurons (basal ganglia, thalamus Ataxia Cerebellar neurons (cerebellum) Hypotonia Lower motor neuron (LMN)
Other movement disorders associated with cerebral palsy, such as athetosis and chorea, are often treated with different oral medications.
ITB Therapy does not help individuals with low muscle tone (often described as floppy muscles), chorea (uncontrollable, small, jerky types of movements of toes and fingers) or athetosis (involuntary movements of face, arms, trunk).
And few even considered the possibility of athletic participation by individuals with athetosis, a less common type of cerebral palsy characterized by a lack of controlled movement.