atheromatous plaque


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Related to atheromatous plaque: atherosclerosis, aneurysm

plaque

 [plak]
1. any patch or flat area.
2. a superficial, solid, elevated skin lesion with a diameter equal to or greater than 1.0 cm (0.5 cm according to some authorities); see also papule.
atheromatous plaque fibrous plaque.
dental plaque a dense, nonmineralized, highly organized biofilm of microbes, organic and inorganic material derived from the saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and bacterial byproducts. It plays an important etiologic role in the development of dental caries and periodontal and gingival diseases; calcified plaque forms dental calculus.
fibrous plaque the lesion of atherosclerosis, a white to yellow area within the wall of an artery that causes the intimal surface to bulge into the lumen; it is composed of lipid, cell debris, smooth muscle cells, collagen, and, in older persons, calcium. Called also atheromatous plaque.
Hollenhorst p's atheromatous emboli containing cholesterol crystals in the retinal arterioles.
pleural p's opaque white plaques on the parietal pleura, visible radiographically in cases of asbestosis.
senile p's microscopic lesions composed of fragmented axon terminals and dendrites surrounding a core of amyloid seen in the cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

ath·er·om·a·tous plaque

a well-demarcated yellow area or swelling on the intimal surface of an artery; produced by intimal lipid deposit.

atheromatous plaque

a yellowish raised area on the lining of an artery formed by fatty deposits indicative of atherosclerosis.

plaque

1. any patch or flat area.
2. a clear area of cell lysis caused by viral replication on a cell monolayer.

amniotic plaque
small, 1 to 2 inch diameter, poxlike lesion on the inside of the amnion. Constant on the bovine amnion during the middle trimester and causes no problems.
annular plaque
seen in equine lupus erythematosus panniculitis.
plaque assay
a method of quantifying the number of infectious units by inoculating serial dilutions of a viral suspension on a cell culture monolayer, overlaying with a medium containing agarose and after several days incubation, counting the number of plaques formed; recorded as plaque forming units/ml.
atheromatous plaque
a deposit of predominantly fatty material in the lining of blood vessels occurring in atherosclerosis.
bacterial plaque, dental plaque
a mass adhering to the enamel surface of a tooth, composed of a mixed colony of bacteria in an intercellular matrix of bacterial and salivary polymers and remnants of epithelial cells and leukocytes. It may cause caries, dental calculi and periodontal disease.
cutaneous plaque
an elevated, solid structure without a necrotic center, up to 1 to 2 inch diameter with an unbroken surface.
drug plaque
cutaneous, subcutaneous or subconjunctival deposits formed as a result of injection of some drugs, particularly repository steroid preparations. May be unsightly and a cause of conjunctivitis.
ear plaque
see ear plaque.
eosinophilic plaque
see eosinophilic plaque.
plaque-forming cells
see plaque assay (above).
plaque-forming count
the number of plaques formed in the plaque assay.
senile plaque
described in the brain of old dogs.
siderotic plaque
nodules observed as dry, yellow encrustations on the splenic capsule of old dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first few centimetres of these vessels are particularly susceptible to atheromatous plaque formation, resulting in cardiac muscle receiving insufficient oxygen to perform properly and thus the body does not receive a sufficient circulation.
Increased neopterin is associated with the presence of vulnerable or disrupted atheromatous plaques (3) and represents a marker of increased risk of further events in patients with ACS (4).
is twofold: reduce the intraplaque concentration of procoagulant and proatherosclerotic microparticles and obtain a rationale for broadening the therapeutics options to stabilize these atheromatous plaques.
26-30) During experimental induction of atherosclerosis in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), atheromatous plaques formed in the arterial intima and inner media.
Data suggest that TNF antagonists might stabilize atheromatous plaques, while other results have shown improved flow-mediated vasodilation and endothelial function associated with TNF antagonists, the researchers said.
Because the increase in PAPP-A occurred within a few minutes after intravenous heparin injection, PAPP-A might be released from the vasculature with atheromatous plaques.
Chlamydia pneumoniae (now renamed Chlamydophila pneumoniae) (1) was detected in coronary atheromatous plaques in early 1990s suggesting an aetiological association (2).
In two CAD cases without old infarction scars the diagnosis was based on obstructive atheromatous plaques observed in the coronary arteries (Table 2).
These unstable atheromatous plaques have three histologic components: a large lipid core, many inflammatory cells, and a thin fibrous cap.
10) Other paleopathology studies of preserved human remains include those of Chinese and Alaskan Inuit ancestry, all of which showed evidence of atheromatous plaques and other indications of CVD.
Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis.
Identification of periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques.