atheroma

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Related to atheromas: atheromatous, Atheromatous plaque

atheroma

 [ath″er-o´mah]
an abnormal mass of fatty or lipid material with a fibrous covering, existing as a discrete, raised plaque within the intima of an artery. adj., adj atherom´atous.

ath·er·o·ma

(ath'er-ō'mă),
The lipid deposits in the intima of arteries, producing a yellow swelling on the endothelial surface; a characteristic of atherosclerosis.
Synonym(s): atherosis
[G. athērē, gruel, + -ōma, tumor]

atheroma

/ath·er·o·ma/ (ath″er-o´mah) a mass or plaque of degenerated thickened arterial intima, occurring in atherosclerosis.

atheroma

(ăth′ə-rō′mə)
n. pl. athero·mas or athero·mata (-mə-tə)
A lipid-containing lesion that forms on the innermost layer of the wall of an artery in atherosclerosis; a plaque.

ath′er·o·ma·to′sis (-tō′sĭs) n.
ath′er·om′a·tous (-rŏm′ə-təs, -rō′mə-) adj.

atheroma

pl. atheromas, atheromata [ath′ərō′mə]
Etymology: Gk, athere, meal, oma, tumor
an abnormal mass of fat or lipids, as in a sebaceous cyst or in deposits in an arterial wall. atheromatous, adj.

ATHEROMA

Angiographic intervention Trial using HMG CoA reductase inhibitor to Evaluate Retardation of Obstructive Multiple Atheroma. A trial comparing changes in coronary atheromas with pravastatin vs diet in patients with CHD.
Conclusion Pravastatin 10–20 mg/day for 3 years improves hyperlipidaemia, then suppresses progression and induces regression of focal coronary atherosclerosis in Japanese coronary artery disease patients with raised serum cholesterol.

ath·er·o·ma

(ath'ĕr-ō'mă)
The lipid deposits in the intima of arteries, producing a yellow swelling on the endothelial surface; a characteristic of atherosclerosis.
[G. athērē, gruel, + -ōma, tumor]

atheroma

The material containing CHOLESTEROL, degenerate muscle cells, blood clot, blood PLATELETS and fibrous tissue, which forms on the inner surface of arteries in the disease of ATHEROSCLEROSIS and which promotes THROMBOSIS and obstruction to the blood flow. From the Greek athara , gruel or porridge, and oma , a lump.

atheroma

degeneration of the inner lining of an artery, caused by the formation of fatty plaques and scar tissue.

atheroma

endproduct of chronic intravascular inflammation and repair, initiated by endothelial injury (e.g. shear stress secondary to hypertension) and leading to lipid deposition and formation of yellow, fatty streaks, characteristic of atherosclerosis

atheroma 

Fatty deposits which lead to the formation of plaques in the blood vessels. See arteriosclerosis; Hollen-horst's plaques.

ath·er·o·ma

(ath'ĕr-ō'mă)
The lipid deposits in the intima of arteries, producing a yellow swelling on the endothelial surface; a characteristic of atherosclerosis.
[G. athērē, gruel, + -ōma, tumor]

atheroma (ath´ərō´mə),

n a fatty, fibrous deposit developing on the artery lining. Also called
atheromatous plaque.

atheroma

an abnormal mass of fatty or lipid material with a fibrous covering, existing as a discrete, raised plaque within the intima of an artery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association between large aortic arch atheromas and high-intensity transient signals in elderly stroke patients.
Recently, thoracic aortic atheroma, proven to be a potential source of embolism (11-16) and a poor prognosis, (2) has been identified by the use of TEE in numerous patients with ischemic stroke.
Preoperative IVUS assessment of the coronary arteries revealed that 17% of teenagers and 37% of those aged 20-29 have IVUS-detectable atheromas (Circulation 103[22]:2705-10, 2001).
In "positive" or expansive remodeling, the vessel wall accommodates the atheroma by expanding outwardly, away from the lumen, thus maintaining lumenal diameter.
1,2) As previously noted, cholesterol crystal embolization emanates from aortoiliac atheromas.
Gofman believed that the interaction between atheromas and lipids blocks arteries and causes blood clots.
Oskar Klotz (12) was quick to point out that, although more specific, Marchand's designation was not applicable to all arteriosclerotic lesions, like those described by Monckeberg, in which no true atheroma is present.