atherogenic


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ath·er·o·gen·ic

(ath'er-ō-jen'ik),
Having the capacity to initiate, increase, or accelerate the process of atherogenesis.

atherogenic

adjective Referring to the ability to initiate or accelerate atherogenesis (the deposition of atheromas, lipids and calcium in the arterial lumen).

atherogenic

adjective Referring to the ability to initiate or accelerate atherogenesis—the deposition of atheromas, lipids, and calcium in the arterial lumen

ath·er·o·gen·ic

(ath'ĕr-ō-jen'ik)
Having the capacity to initiate, increase, or accelerate the process of atherogenesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we demonstrated that SFTE could prevent morphological and functional changes of the arterial wall of guinea pig aortas as a result of an 8-week atherogenic diet.
The studies presented here were performed to evaluate the atherogenic potential of arsenic using a well-established and controlled animal model of human atherosclerosis, mice deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE), and in vitro systems including primary human vascular cells.
In conjunction with these previous studies, the increase of small VLDL-C in CAD patients also supports the concept that smaller, partially catabolized triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (VLDL remnants) and/or a part of intermediate-density lipoprotein are atherogenic.
For the practicing clinician, however, the major argument for extending measurement of subclasses into the mass market is the hypothesis that one subclass is more atherogenic than another.
The authors noted that, "in addition to the regression of the carotid lesion size, the lesion itself may be considered less atherogenic after pomegranate juice consumption, as its cholesterol and oxidized lipid content decreased, and since its ability to oxidize LDL was significantly reduced.
Based on the results of several studies, the combination of a statin and a fibrate (either gemfibrozil or fenofibrate) appears to be very effective for normalizing serum lipid levels in patients who have diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or atherogenic dyslipidemia, which features a high level of serum triglycerides and a low level of HDL cholesterol.
Dysbetalipoproteinemia (type III hyperlipidemia) is a highly atherogenic mixed hyperlipidemia characterized by the accumulation of remnants of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) (1).
In another double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase IIa clinical trial (GFT505-2083) conducted in 98 patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia (high triglycerides, low HDL-C) and abdominal obesity, treatment with GFT505 (80 mg/day) for 28 consecutive days led to a significant reduction in plasma triglycerides and a significant increase in HDL-C levels.
These experts reaffirmed the continuing role of generic lipid-modifying treatments, fenofibrate and bezafibrate, in treating atherogenic dyslipidemia, which is commonly observed in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes and is characterized by elevated triglycerides and low 'good' high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
NEW YORK -- A combination of niacin and omega-3 fatty acids produced a substantial drop in triglyceride levels and a large rise in HDL cholesterol levels in a controlled study in 14 patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia.
Hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) (1-5), and it is an integral component of the overlapping syndromes of familial combined hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance syndrome, atherogenic lipoprotein profile, and hyperapobetali-poproteinemia (6).