atheroembolism

ath·er·o·em·bo·lism

(ath'er-ō-em'bō-lizm),
Cholesterol embolism, with or without calcific matter, originating from an atheroma of the aorta or other diseased artery.

atheroembolism

[ath′ərō·em′bəliz′əm]
obstruction of a blood vessel by an atherosclerotic embolism originating from an atheroma in a major artery.

ath·er·o·em·bo·lism

(ath'ĕr-ō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Cholesterol embolism, with or without calcific matter, originating from an atheroma of the aorta or other diseased artery.

atheroembolism

embolism due to blockage of a blood vessel by an atheroembolus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Atheroembolism is not as well-known and is usually described in the literature as microembolism.
2) The brain was the most common site of atheroembolism and severe atherosclerosis of the ascending aorta increased the risk for cholesterol emboli.
Evaluation for atherosclerosis of the aorta is not routinely performed preoperatively in children, although atheroembolism from the ascending aorta is a major etiologic factor for stroke in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.
Nonneoplastic Changes in Nephrectomy Specimens Removed for Renal Neoplasms * Changes Percentage Normal 10 Vascular changes with normal parenchyma 29 Vascular changes with parenchymal scarring 22 Diabetic nephropathy 23 Others 8 Atheroembolism 2 Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis 2.
An institutional experience with arterial atheroembolism.
The chronic effects of hypertension and type 2 diabetes on the renal vasculature lead to renal diseases involving nephroschlerosis, atherosclerosis, and atheroembolism (Gomez et al.
Characterized by systemic atheroembolism that can involve the skin, brain, eyes, kidneys, or extremities, the syndrome is caused by "distal showering of cholesterol crystals from aortic atheromatous plaques" that are dislodged by the cardiac procedure.
Common intraoperative complications include atheroembolism, declamping hypotension, acute renal failure (most commonly acute tubular necrosis), ureteral injury, and hemorrhage.
The possibility of using a brachial approach for aortogram or coronary angiogram to prevent atheroembolism needs to be considered (1).
28) However, angiography has significant potential risks, including contrast-induced renal failure, atheroembolism, local puncture site bleeding, p uncture site pseudoaneurysm formation, and anaphylaxis.
Berns JS, Cohen RM, et al: Nephrotoxic risks of renal angiography: contrast media associated nephrotoxicity and atheroembolism.
A definitive diagnosis of renovascular disease requires renal angiography, which carries some risk, especially radio-contrast-induced acute renal failure or atheroembolism in older patients.