ate


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ate

(āt)
v.
Past tense of eat
References in classic literature ?
The taboo of the dog, as he expounded it, had prevented him from interfering with the taboo dog when it ate the taboo egg-layers.
Button-Bright looked curiously at the man who had "no appetite inside him," for the Tin Woodman, although he had prepared so fine a feast for his guests, ate not a mouthful himself, sitting patiently in his place to see that all built so they could eat were well and plentifully served.
What pleased Button-Bright most about the dinner was the tin orchestra that played sweet music while the company ate.
Altogether it was a merry meal, although Polychrome ate little and the host nothing at all.
When researchers tracked more than 34,000 women for 18 years, those who ate at least four servings of beans a week had a 33 percent lower risk of colon adenomas than those who ate beans no more than once a week.
They found that mice on the high-DHA diet had only about 30 percent as many deposits of a waxy protein called beta-amyloid--a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease--compared with mice that ate little or no DHA.
From September 2004 to January 2005, stool specimens of patients who ate raw fish were examined to determine the prevalence of diphyllobothriasis.
Our ancestors ate a wide variety of in-season, wildcrafted, and organically grown plants.
From that day on, I never ate meat without thinking about how the animals had suffered to provide food for me.
The Seychelles mothers ate a variety of fish that contain similar concentrations of methylmercury as fish eaten in the United States.
We observed, for example, that while some Chinese residents were somewhat "Americanized" and ate Western food, others often ate little of the food that was served.