at-risk drinking

at-risk drinking

(ăt′rĭsk″)
The consumption of a potentially unhealthy amount of alcohol. Men are said to participate in at-risk drinking when they consume more than four alcoholic drinks a day (or 14 or more drinks a week). At-risk drinking for women consists of the consumption of more than three drinks a day, or seven or more drinks a week.
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In a recent study, combat exposure among Army enlisted women was associated with an increased likelihood of developing behavioral health problems post-deployment, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and at-risk drinking.
The health care delivery system remains one of the most efficient and effective venues in which to detect at-risk drinking, combined use of alcohol and psychoactive prescription medications, and comorbid mental and physical health conditions in older adults.
If we had none of these programs I expect we would have more of these (infractions) or more instances of at-risk drinking.
These guidelines use differential definitions of at-risk drinking for women and
In recognition of alcohol's potentially life-altering consequences for the developing fetus, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) produced an FASD prevention tool kit in 2006 and published a 2011 committee opinion on at-risk drinking and alcohol dependence and their implications for obstetrics and gynecology.
We think that our findings suggest that it may be important to not just screen older adults for at-risk drinking or alcohol abuse, but also to look at history of past use and changes in use that may be associated with cognitive impairment.
To investigate a possible link with depression and anxiety, participants were also screened for at-risk drinking behaviour.
Brief interventions for patients presenting to the Psychiatric Emergency Service (PES) with major mental illnesses and at-risk drinking.
An intervention program aimed at curbing at-risk drinking among older adults succeeded in helping these individuals significantly reduce their overall alcohol consumption, according to a UCLA study published in the January issue of the journal Addiction.
The researchers also looked at the incidence of "at-risk drinking"--defined as drinking an average of at least two drinks per day-and found that 19 percent of men and 13 percent of women in the 50-64 age range engaged in at-risk drinking.
In fact, a study published in April in The Cochrane Library found that brief interventions--in which doctors tell patients about the harms of at-risk drinking and strategies to reduce consumption--helped problem drinkers cut their alcohol intake by about four to five drinks a week.
With the high prevalence of alcohol use among collegians, it is likely this particular age group will experience the negative consequences of at-risk drinking.