at-risk


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Related to at-risk: Value-at-Risk

at-risk

(ăt′rĭsk′)
adj.
1. In danger of suffering from mistreatment, injury, disease, or the effects of dysfunctional behavior: after-school programs for at-risk youth; screening at-risk seniors for diabetes.
2. Likely to result in injury, disease, or other negative consequences: at-risk occupations; at-risk behaviors.
References in periodicals archive ?
At-risk symptomatic adult family members of FAP may seek testing in order to make personal decisions regarding reproduction, financial matters, and career planning.
The 2015 report also points to the success of the Village Way Educational Initiatives as it takes great strides toward changing the face of education for at-risk youth in Israel.
Many at-risk students end up attending community colleges, and they are attracted to the "anytime/anyplace" virtue of online courses offered there (Hyllegard, Deng & Hunter, 2008).
This points to a serious disconnect, since weight and physical activity are two risk factors that more than half of at-risk patients discuss with their providers regularly," explains Virginia Peragallo-Dittko, chair of the association's prevention committee.
The at-risk rules were designed to prevent the deduction of losses when the taxpayer is protected from suffering an actual out-of-pocket loss.
Information suggesting which patients have the highest likelihood of at-risk drinking may assist physicians to better target patients for further screening and intervention.
A shareholder who has a suspended loss carryover because of an at-risk limitation may contribute shares of a "loss" corporation to one without a loss, followed by a QSub election-provided the shareholder actively participates in both operations.
Such a bond is critical in any productive context for learning but is often lacking in the lives of at-risk learners.
In a preliminary attempt to find a user-friendly technique for identifying at-risk students, a pilot longitudinal study was undertaken at Ithaca College using a convenient, 30 item, multiple-choice hardiness questionnaire (Bartone, 1991).
Founded in 1978, the Andrew Glover Youth Program is a community-based organization that provides alternatives to incarceration and crime prevention programs to youthful offenders and at-risk youths from the Lower East Side and East Harlem.
NDIIPP aims to address both issues while also ensuring the preservation of at-risk digital content.