at-risk


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Related to at-risk: Value-at-Risk

at-risk

(ăt′rĭsk′)
adj.
1. In danger of suffering from mistreatment, injury, disease, or the effects of dysfunctional behavior: after-school programs for at-risk youth; screening at-risk seniors for diabetes.
2. Likely to result in injury, disease, or other negative consequences: at-risk occupations; at-risk behaviors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grimes in 2005, CARRY offers free dermatologic care and support to those who need it most--foster and at-risk youth.
However, the at-risk rules may frequently limit the ability of LLC members to deduct losses.
An S corporation shareholder has at-risk basis to the extent of contributions to the corporation and unencumbered funds lent by the shareholder to the corporation, if the lent funds are borrowed by the shareholder, they create at-risk basis to the extent the shareholder is personally responsible for their repayment.
Further, findings from this study also suggest that screening practices should focus additional attention on disciplinary contacts given that disciplinary contacts, as well as CEI scores, was also able to distinguish between at-risk children with and without ABH.
The research showed that gang members were much more likely to sell drugs than nongang at-risk youths.
If at-risk adolescents can be taught to eat a low-fat diet and exercise faithfully, says Kotchen, they may be able to keep their hearts healthy well into the future.
Many questions have been raised about the education of at-risk learners.
In addition, such premium payments for at-risk jobs or a strategic industry, together with incentive payments under the Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program Act, cannot exceed five percent of gross payroll.
Work Practice Controls, in which at-risk workers and at-risk jobs are matched.
Researchers point out that "at-risk students differ from their peers along a critical variable: locus of control" (Meeting the Needs of At-Risk Students, Research Roundup, Vol.
As the economy stumbles along further decimating state revenue, regulators continue to aggressively pursue any dollar they can find, and they are honing in on at-risk assets held by mutual fund and brokerage companies," said Jim Keyser, Chief Operating Officer, Equisearch.
Congress originally enacted the at-risk rules in the Tax Reform Act of 1976 (2) to curb tax shelters that gave taxpayers deductions for nonrecourse debt.