asynchronous learning


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asynchronous learning

A method of instruction in which students access course material and engage with instructors and other students from geographically disparate locations or at different times. Techniques in asynchronous learning include on-line chats, threaded discussions, or self-directed learning modules. Before the world wide web, asynchronous learning was called correspondence education.
See also: learning
References in periodicals archive ?
Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 7(1) Retrieved on March 30, 2006 from http/www.
The threaded discussion, which is the mainstay of the asynchronous learning network (ALN) model, can provide a communications vehicle for each student to participate at his or her convenience.
The bottom line we've come to is we're really talking past each other," says John Bourne, executive director of Sloan-C and editor of the Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks.
html) uses a combination of synchronous and asynchronous learning, by permitting working executives to travel to different continents for two-week sessions each semester and then to complete the remaining coursework via the Web.
To conduct the extended self-assessment asynchronous learning quiz, log on to www.
Combining synchronous and asynchronous learning, AP will enhance its blended online instructional model at partner universities throughout the world by adding Zoom's technology to enhance faculty-student interaction, providing professors with a means to employ the Socratic teaching method in online education.
In Online Education: Proceedings of the 2000 Sloan Summer Workshop on Asynchronous Learning Networks, 31-54.
They reported using a variety of course management systems for synchronous and asynchronous learning activities.
They address the definition of e-learning--taking issue with that of the Higher Education Funding Council of England--followed by discussion of predecessors to e-learning, asynchronous learning networks, computers and writing, the state of the digital divide, the online experience of gamers, and sciences that design and study learning environments.
I say this after recently having the pleasure of editing an edition of the Sloan-C Journal of Asynchronous Learning that included in-depth explorations of demographic trends, technological tools, and change-management strategies from well known researchers and practitioners across higher education.
Nevertheless, I'm not a big fan of asynchronous learning, mainly because I learn more through dialogue.
These dynamics call for new and innovative education systems such as asynchronous learning networks.
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