asymmetry


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asymmetry

 [a-sim´ĕ-tre]
lack or absence of symmetry; dissimilarity in corresponding parts or organs on opposite sides of the body that are normally alike. In chemistry, lack of symmetry in the special arrangements of the atoms and radicals within the molecule or crystal. adj., adj asymmet´rical.

a·sym·me·try

(ā-sim'e-trē),
1. Lack of symmetry; disproportion between two parts normally alike.
2. Significant difference in amplitude or frequency of EEG activity recorded simultaneously from the two sides of the brain under identical conditions.
Synonym(s): dissymmetry

asymmetry

/asym·me·try/ (a-sim´ĕ-tre) lack or absence of symmetry; dissimilarity in corresponding parts or organs on opposite sides of the body which are normally alike. In chemistry, lack of symmetry in the special arrangements of the atoms and radicals within the molecule or crystal.asymmet´rical

asymmetry

asymmetry

Lacking symmetry Neurology A proportional difference/discordance between the right/left hemispheres, especially vis-`a-vis function

a·sym·me·try

(ā-sim'ĕ-trē)
1. Lack of symmetry; disproportion between two normally similar parts.
2. Significant difference in amplitude or frequency of electroencephalographic activity recorded simultaneously from the two sides of the brain.

asymmetry,

n lack of symmetry, particularly in situations where some form of symmetry is to be expected.

a·sym·me·try

(ā-sim'ĕ-trē)
Lack of symmetry; disproportion between two parts normally alike.

asymmetry,

n an inharmonious relationship between the maxillary and mandibular teeth during closure or functional jaw movements or facial features.

asymmetry

1. lack or absence of symmetry; dissimilarity in corresponding parts or organs on opposite sides of the body which are normally alike.
2. in chemistry, lack of symmetry in the special arrangements of the atoms and radicals within the molecule or crystal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Facial asymmetry correction in facial palsy patients with Silhouette Sutures.
Molar relationship asymmetry equivalent to half cusp (Class I on one side and class II1/2 cusp or class III1/2 on the other side) and the asymmetry equivalent to full cusp (Class I on one side and full cusp class II or class III on other side) was also noted as suggested by Behbahani.
Future studies should further examine LE asymmetry, factors contributing to LE asymmetry, and its potential relation to injury risk in dancers.
Because random deviations in symmetry can occur to either the left or right side of a trait, signed fluctuating asymmetry values fit a normal distribution with a mean of zero (Mpller and Swaddle, 1997).
For the same area of asymmetry, models with asymmetry in one direction has lesser rate of increase of torsion than that with asymmetry in both directions.
Each signed (+ or -) bilateral asymmetry (left minus right) was tested for normality with mean zero by the Shapiro-Wilk statistic and one sample t-test using SAS 9.
The question thus arises: how may one fruitfully discuss asymmetry as a separate phenomenon?
Some reports suggest asymmetry in ground reaction forces are related to biasing the body's center of mass toward the contralateral limb [14-15].
In George Akerlof's seminal paper "The Market for Lemons," he noted that markets can fail when information asymmetry is too high.