assonance

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assonance

(as′ŏ-năns) [L. assonare, to sound to, answer to]
1. Similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. Abnormal tendency to use alliteration.
assonant (-nănt), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Many words combine the senses of their times with their assonances in some manner: to sting, for instance, is to direct force (-in) with a one-dimensional rigid (indeed, pointed) object (st-).
Phonosemantically coherent words may be old or new; Old English vocabulary displays much the same sets of categories with much the same sets of assonances, and as we have seen, the st- assonance class has been around at least five thousand years, since Indo-European, or even before.
Parenthetically, the fact that English assonances are much more coherent than rimes is completely consistent with the fact that Old English poetry displays much more initial cluster repetition than it does rhyming.
In the process, however, he did establish the standard terminology, distinguishing between a syllable's assonance (word- or syllable-initial consonant cluster), and its rime (concatenated vocalic nucleus and final consonant cluster); thus in the word stump, for instance, the assonance is st- and the rime is -ump.
1]- assonance (1D Connected: brush, branch, briar, bramble, etc.
It is impossible to say the opening lines of the Iliad other than slowly, and it is impossible not to dwell on the assonance of long vowels.
2]), and to Shalmaneser III's uruHal-man (erroneously identified with Halab [Aleppo] because of assonance and the presence of a temple of the storm-god in each of those cities).