associative play

associative play

a form of play in which a group of children participate in similar or identical activities without formal organization, group direction, group interaction, or a definite goal. The children may borrow or lend toys or pieces of play equipment, and they may imitate others in the group, but each child acts independently, as on a playground or among a group riding tricycles or bicycles. Compare cooperative play. See also parallel play, solitary play.

as·so·ci·a·tive play

(ă-sō'sē-ă-tiv plā)
Play in which each child participates in a separate activity, but with the cooperation and assistance of the others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of this, many of the close-up images of bed sheets fluctuate between abstraction and figuration, allowing their representational armature a freer, more associative play of form.
Conventional words or other signs have to be sought for laboriously only in a secondary stage, when the mentioned associative play is sufficiently established and can be reproduced at will.
While there clearly is a true "social" element to associative play, it should be noted that each child's actual activity remains essentially separate from the activities of the other children.
While the anecdotal, collage-like structure of the book can be an effective way to mimic the associative play of memory, it can also become a device for moving forward without sufficient reflection.
Children are described as engaging in onlooker play, solitary play, parallel play, and associative play.
The desperate selves of the associative play are sometimes projected in narrative and sometimes objectively there, but no sooner does one feel located than there are displacements of space and time.
associative play for Michael, as shown in Figure 2,
Subsequent Observations Analysis of the data collected in subsequent observations replicated the finding that parallel play was functionally related to the segregated setting, whereas associative play was related to the integrated setting, as shown in Figures 2 and 3.
Trockel brings together objects that encourage free associative play, unencumbered by the rigid ordering often imposed by the museum.

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