association

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Related to associational: seek out, passed on, lined up, dropping by

association

 [ah-so″se-a´shun]
1. a state in which two attributes occur together either more or less often than expected by chance.
2. in neurology, a term applied to those regions of the brain (association areas) that link the primary motor and sensory areas.
3. in genetics, the occurrence together of two or more phenotypic characteristics more often than would be expected by chance. To be distinguished from linkage (q.v.).
4. in psychiatry, a connection between ideas or feelings, especially between conscious thoughts and elements of the unconscious, or the formation of such a connection.
clang association see clanging.
free association in psychoanalysis, verbal expression by the patient of ideas as they arrive spontaneously, without censoring or withholding anything, no matter how distressing, embarrassing, trivial, or irrelevant it may seem. The analyst forms tentative explanations of the patient's associations and experiences but withholds them until they are validated by more material and until the patient is in a receptive frame of mind.
association test one based on associative reaction, usually by mentioning words to a patient and noting what other words he or she gives as the ones called to mind; see association (def. 4).

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn),
1. A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
See also: conditioning.
See also: genetic association.
2. A functional connection of two ideas, events, or psychological phenomena established through learning or experience.
See also: conditioning.
See also: genetic association.
3. Statistical dependence between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables.
See also: genetic association.
4. genetics a grouping of congenital anomalies found together more frequently than otherwise expected; use of this term implies that the cause is unknown.
See also: genetic association.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

association

/as·so·ci·a·tion/ (ah-so″se-a´shun)
1. a state in which two attributes occur together either more or less often than expected by chance.
2. a term applied to those regions of the brain that link the primary motor and sensory cortices; see association areas, under area.
3. the occurrence together of two or more phenotypic characteristics more often than would be expected by chance.
4. a connection between ideas or feelings, especially between conscious thoughts and elements of the unconscious, or the formation of such a connection.

CHARGE association  a syndrome of associated defects including c oloboma of the eye, h eart anomaly, choanal a tresia, r etardation, and g enital and e ar anomalies, and often including facial palsy, cleft palate, and dysphagia.
free association  verbal expression of one's ideas as they arrive spontaneously; a method used in psychoanalysis.

association

[əsō′shē·ā′shən]
Etymology: L, associare, to unite
1 a connection, union, joining, or combination of things.
2 (in psychology) the connection of remembered feelings, emotions, sensations, thoughts, or perceptions with particular persons, things, or ideas. Kinds of association are association of ideas, clang association, controlled association, dream association, and free association.

association

Epidemiology
noun A statistical relationship between two or more events, characteristics or other variables—e.g., an association between exposure to X and a health effect, Y—which may not imply cause and effect.

EBM
noun A known link or a statistical dependence between two or more events, conditions, characteristics or other variables.
 
Genetics
noun
(1) The simultaneous occurrence ≥ 2 phenotypic characteristics more often than would be expected by change.
(2) The non-random occurrence in ≥ 2 individuals of multiple anomalies not known to correspond to a polytopic field defect, sequence or syndrome.
 
Informatics
noun The relationship between a client node and a client schedule, which identifies the names of a schedule, the policy domain to which the schedule belongs and the client node that performs scheduled operations.
 
Managed care
See Captive IPA.
 
Neurology
adjective Referring to an area of the brain that links motor and sensory cortical areas.
     
Psychiatry
noun
(1) Any connection between the conscious and the unconscious.
(2) A relationship between ideas and emotions by contiguity, continuity or similarity.

Support services
See Joint Underwriters Association.
 
Vox populi
noun An organised group of similarly-minded individuals (e.g., American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, American Osteopathic Association, Independent Practice Association, etc.).

association

adjective Neurology Referring to an area of the brain that links motor and sensory cortical areas. See Visual association noun Epidemiology A statistical relationship between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables–eg, an association between an exposure to X and a health effect. Y, which does not necessarily imply cause and effect Psychiatry
1. Any connection between the conscious and the unconscious.
2. A relationship between ideas and emotions by contiguity, continuity, or similarity. See Clang association, Direct association, Free association, Loosening of associations, Strength of association Vox populi An organized group of similarly-minded individuals. See AALAS, American Association of Acupuncture & Oriental Medicine, American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, American Osteopathic Association, Blue Cross & Blue Shield Association, Independent practice association, International Association of Cancer Victims & Friends, National Rifle Association, World Medical Association.

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn)
1. A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
2. A movement seen in the opposite limb when increased concentration, tone, or effort is exerted (e.g., increased elbow flexion in one arm while the other moves).
3. A functional connection of two ideas, events, or psychological phenomena established through learning or experience.
See also: conditioning
4. Statistical dependence between two or more events, characteristics, or other variables.
5. genetics A grouping of congenital anomalies found together more frequently than otherwise expected; the use of this term implies that the cause is unknown.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

association

a small natural grouping of plants which live together. The term originally denoted a whole habitat, e.g. a pine forest, but is now usually applied to much smaller groupings. Compare CONSOCIATION.

as·so·ci·a·tion

(ă-sō'sē-ā'shŭn)
A connection of people, things, or ideas by some common factor.
[L. as-socio, pp. -sociatus, to join to; ad + socius, companion]

association,

n a connection, union, joining, or combination of things.

association

1. close relation in time or space. In neurology, correlation involving a high degree of modifiability and also consciousness. In genetics, the occurrence together of two characteristics (e.g. blood group O and peptic ulcers) at a frequency greater than would be predicted on the basis of chance.
2. in statistics an association is present if the probability of an event, or the quantity of a variable, depends on the occurrence of other events or the quantity of other variables. If the weight of evidence suggests that the changes in one of the variables causes the alteration in the other the association is said to be causal. In the reverse situation, where no such causal relationship exists, the association is said to be a noncausal one.

association areas
areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, etc.
epidemiological association
the association between a disease and a cause.
association points
in acupuncture terms all are located on the bladder meridian, along the back 1 to 1.5 inches from the midline. Called also shu points.
Enlarge picture
Acupuncture association points. By permission from Schoen AM, Wynn SG, Pratt PW, Alternative and Complementary Therapies in Veterinary Medicine, 1997
association strength (degree)
the strength of association between a disease and a cause. Is usually indicated by the relative risk.

Patient discussion about association

Q. is there ususlly strange feelings associated with seizures? I am 30 years and i have just been diagnosed with absence seizures. There are some strange feeing that i cannot identify as fear or fustration or anxiety or depression or sadness associated with this new illness. Is it normal? Can it be identified? How can i get rid of all the conditions associated with this disease as well as the absence seizure itself?

A. any affect that the seizures have on your personality (mood change and such)can go away if the condition will be treated. treating epilepsy seizures require first of all a good neurologist. he will help you the treatment that will suite you the most. there are more then one line of treatments in epilepsy.

Q. In what way the brain fog symptom associated with fibromyalgia? In what way the brain fog symptom associated with fibromyalgia? What are the other symptoms of fibromyalgia?

A. memory loss is also associated with Fibromyalgia...lack of concentration and you just feel like you are in a fog...can't remember....can't think. Our standing joke at my house is "I am in the "fog" today. The one thing my doctor ALWAYS reminds me of fibro affects people differently, remember you may not have all the sympoms or you may have ones others don't but fibromyalgia is widespread pain that has lasted 3 months or more, it is pain of the fibrous tissue - ligiments, tendons and muscles. You feel stiff and achy all over. There are trigger points such as neck, shoulders, spine and hips. Chronic fatigue taht is possibly related to the disturbed sleep patterns. Most suffers I have talked to have restless leg syndrome and headaches. Irritable bowl is associated but on that one I am lucky I haven't had the problem but have had swolling problems and vision problems...I hope this helps. Good Luck!

Q. WHAT ARE SOME EYE DISORDERS ASSOCIATED WITH ALLZHEIMERS POTAAQU? MY MOTHERS BRAIN DOES NOT TELL HER EYES WHAT IT IS SHE IS LOOKING AT? THE DOCTORS DIAGNOSED HER WITH ALLZHEIMERS FIRST AND REALLY DON'T KNOW FOR SURE IF IT IS CAUSED BY ALLZHEIMERS OR IF THE EYE DISORDER IS HER MAIN PROBLEM WITH MEMORY.

A. Sight problems can generally be divided into two broad categories - problems with the eyes (i.e. problems with converting the rays of light to electrical impulses, actually seeing) and problems with the brain (i.e. problems with interpreting what we actually see). If you suspect she has a problem with seeing, it may be worth to consult an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) - they can usually check if the eye functions well, even if the patient doesn't fully cooperate.

If the eyes are found to be OK, than problems with the brain are usually addressed by a neurologist (nerves and brain doctor), although it's not sure a problem in this level is treatable.

More discussions about association
References in periodicals archive ?
In such places, decisions about involvement in associational life, both individual and in the aggregate, are less likely to be affected by pre-existing sentiment toward ethnic others.
22) The court advanced the principle that "a state generally may not restrict the ability of a political party to define the group of citizens that will choose its standard-bearer"; (23) accordingly, it found that section 1-104 imposed a severe burden on the plaintiffs' associational rights and demanded strict scrutiny.
consistent with Brandenburg from an associational perspective.
For the New Economy, there will be no pattern of trust regarding gender for any of the three associational interpersonal groups [Supervisors, Peers and Team] nor for the two factor dimensions [Professional and Personal].
Ominously, because the drive against associational rights is conducted without violence, the process attracts little notice from the outside world.
As an objective matter, associational freedom is not only a lawful activity but a vital and core part of the type of activity that must not be chilled by government surveillance.
It is also a must-read for those studying questions around the nature of governance and the changing space for independent associational life in the cities of East Asia.
It's the content - and the vast potential for government abuse - in programs such as the NSA's Associational Tracking Program, a massive telephone metadata dragnet that collects information about every phone call that's placed in the United States.
According to Professor Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and the CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital, this is the first time ever that a stringently controlled associational birth cohort study has looked at and found a relationship between too much toddler screen time and kindergarten risks for poor motor skills and psychosocial difficulties, such as victimization by classmates.
This is the first time ever that a stringently controlled associational birth cohort study has looked at and found a relationship between too much toddler screen time and kindergarten risks for poor motor skills and psychosocial difficulties, like victimization by classmates," Professor Linda Pagani of the University of Montreal and the CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital said.
Scholars of industrial relations, labor studies, political science, sociology, and other fields explore the ways that transnational unionism is shaped by the exercise of structural and associational power.

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