assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, Data analysis indicated high school boys students' were mostly assimilators and divergers followed by convergers and accommodators.
Our findings surprised us: Convergers and Assimilators were the preferred learning styles of a majority of the nursing students, while several earlier studies reported a predominance of Divergers and Accommodators.
Specifically, the culture assimilator and contrast-American techniques were developed with funding from the military, yet are rarely, if ever, used in military cultural training today.
Students with this approach to learning are described by Felder and Brent(13) as Type Two Assimilators.
Thirty-one percent of the nurses were accommodators, 20% were assimilators, 19% were convergers, and 20% were divergers.
Cultural assimilators are created to teach trainees how to interpret an event from the perspective of another culture and not immediately respond from our American inclination.
Assimilators get mainly involved with refining abstract theories rather than developing workable strategies and solutions.
By "loss" we mean that assimilators lose both competence in and identification with the ancestral culture as they successfully enter the mainstream.
Overall, Spirit Wars provides an informative and useful overview of Aboriginal religion and culture in encounter with evangelists and secular assimilators.
Finally, a number of recent studies have examined multimedia in terms of the Kolb Learning Style Inventory which distinguishes four types, namely, (a) divergers, (b) assimilators, (c) convergers and (d) accommodators (Karakaya, 2001; Kettanurak et al.
The arabinose non-assimilators (Ara-) are virulent and can be isolated from both clinical specimens and the environment, whereas the arabinose assimilators (Ara+) are usually avirulent and mainly found in the environment (9,10).
Assimilators are analytical and excellent at organizing information.