assimilate

(redirected from assimilator)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then concrete experience scores is subtracted of the abstract conceptualization scores and the reflective observation scores is subtracted of the active experimentation scores, that these scores (AC-CE, AE-RO) represents the four learning styles: assimilator, diverger, converger, and accommodator [13].
P3: Students with Assimilator and Convergor learning styles will perform better using a web-based PBL course design than students with Divergor and Accomodator learning styles
Hundreds of assimilators are in print, some of them focusing on the general intercultural issues, including expectations, stress, communication and language issues, value differences, and adjustment.
We could have easily built that technology ourselves, taking our Assimilator technology and putting it in a box," he said.
In fact, Pallet shows that Milk Train represents a watershed in Williams's dramaturgy, as Williams, always a rapid assimilator of influences, absorbed the work of Yukio Mishima, substantially abandoning a traditionally Western neorealistic approach for more international techniques.
But just as he was a devourer and assimilator of Andalusia's past, and Granada's past in particular, he had a thirst for the future of literature--his friendships with Pablo Neruda and, above all, to Salvador Dali were emblematic--each successive book of Lorca was a new beginning, a break with the most recent innovation.
Kolb's behaviour types of Accommodator and Diverger match closely with the socially oriented constructivist, and the behaviour types Assimilator and Converger link closely with the cognitive-oriented constructivist (Kolb, 1984).
Golub's master in the end, it seems, is neither Dubuffet nor Picabia, but another great assimilator, Picasso--the Picasso of Guernica (a model of painting's public function), but also the Picasso of Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (painting as trauma).
The controversy over the presumed Americanization of the planet, for example, often glosses over the fact that the United States, which is a big exporter of culture, is at the same time a great importer and assimilator of foreign cultures.
Kolb described four types of learning styles: diverger, assimilator, converger, and accommodator.
Modernizing and Aboriginality are not an oxymoron when joined together; and finally, unlike assimilation, which privileges the assimilator welcoming new members to the club, "modernizing" underlines the reality even if limited, of Aboriginal choice of direction and goal.