cultural assimilation

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cultural assimilation

[kul′chərəl]
a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that distinguish them from the dominant cultural group or take on the cultural characteristics of another group.
References in periodicals archive ?
His study of the 1927 Jazz Singer and its various remakes, indeed broadens our understanding of this classic assimilationist narrative through comparison with its anti-assimilationist Yiddish counterparts, The Cantor's Son (1937) and Overture to Glory (1940).
Critically, Austin-Broos is careful to distinguish assimilationist educational policy requiring conformity or transformation from what she calls 'radical democratic pluralism'-a distinction borrowed from Iris Marion-Young (p.
Her discussion of Acosta's conversion to the Baptist church, which provided him with a potential inroad to white Protestant culture, shows the assimilationist potential of the conversion narrative in America.
They discuss the way contemporary migration challenges the notion of the Nation State and its myth of homogeneity; they reflect on the necessity for monocultural and assimilationist models of national identity to regard their immigration in a positive way and to reconsider the way people take part in a society.
are influenced by paternalistic and assimilationist ideals.
What Carlson does exceedingly well is to convince his readers that social transformations (sometimes dramatic ones involving permanent changes to central social structures) should not be seen as inauthentic, assimilationist, or as arising only in responses to "new" things (i.
The second part of Berbers and Others presents three case studies localized in Morocco and Algeria but contextualized within a global environment that has inspired Berber activism and constrained assimilationist actions.
Holcombe recommends this emphasis along with a view that eschews 'employment parity' for Aboriginal people on the grounds that it is a faint hope, and assimilationist.
Tolentino views Bulosan and Wong as strongly influenced by post-World War II sociology that held an emphatically assimilationist vision in championing "model minority" narratives, which claimed that the problems of minorities such as the Chinese and Filipinos would eventually be solved when they integrated fully with mainstream American culture.
The assimilationist negation of difference had dramatic consequences.
Arcadie, with its assimilationist goals, never approved of these liberationist politics, and the magazine began to fade now that coming out was the strategy of the day.
This assimilationist approach to everyday aesthetics, Saito maintains, distorts our understanding of everyday aesthetics, leading us to undervalue or entirely miss its unique features, breadth, and significance.