assimilation


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Related to assimilation: Cultural assimilation

assimilation

 [ah-sim″ĭ-la´shun]
1. conversion of nutritive material into living tissue; anabolism.
2. psychologically, absorption of new experiences into the existing psychologic makeup.
3. the process by which members of a culture change their lifeways in order to become totally integrated into another culture.

as·sim·i·la·tion

(ă-sim'i-lā'shŭn),
1. Incorporation of digested materials from food into the tissues.
2. Integration of newly perceived information and experiences into the existing cognitive structure.
[L. as-similo, pp. -atus, to make alike]

assimilation

/as·sim·i·la·tion/ (ah-sim″ĭ-la´shun)
1. psychologically, absorption of new experiences into existing psychologic make-up.

assimilation

(ə-sĭm′ə-lā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of assimilating.
b. The state of being assimilated.
2. Physiology The conversion of nutriments into living tissue; constructive metabolism.

assimilation

Etymology: L, assimulare, to make alike
1 the process of incorporating nutritive material into living tissue. The end stage of the nutrition process, after digestion and absorption or simultaneous with absorption.
2 (in psychology) the incorporation of new experiences into a person's pattern of consciousness. Compare apperception.
3 (in sociology) the process in which a person or a group of people of a different ethnic background become absorbed into a new culture. assimilate, v.

assimilation

Medspeak-UK
The process of incorporating a support worker—e.g., secretary, porter, courier, etc.—whose pay band was not clarified on a hospital trust’s payroll during the Agenda for Change transition.

Psychology
Piaget’s term for a person’s comprehension and integration of new experiences into the mind, or mental schemes.

assimilation

Psychiatry A person's comprehension and integration of new experiences

as·sim·i·la·tion

(ă-sim'i-lā'shŭn)
1. Incorporation of digested materials from food into the tissues.
2. Integration of newly perceived information and experiences into the existing cognitive structure.
[L. as-similo, pp. -atus, to make alike]

assimilation

The process of incorporating nutrient material into cells after digestion and absorption.

assimilation

the intake by organisms of new materials from the outside and their incorporation into the internal structure of the organism.

assimilation

conversion of nutritive material into living tissue; anabolism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, examining each stage with a particular interaction helps in determining a better understanding of reality and relationships, as related to organizational assimilation and humor.
The effect of the assimilation of SST and SSH observations can be seen to, in general, reduce the off-shore temperature gradient associated with coastal upwelling and weaken the mean northwards and off-shore surface flow.
The general aim of our work was to assess the impact of the ASCAT data assimilation into the HIRLAM analysis in case of extreme events such as severe storms.
Taking into account some of the difficulties posed by assimilationism with a homogenizing tendency as well as by multiculturalism, such scholars as Rogers Brubaker and the tandem of Christian Joppka and Ewa Morawska have argued for what Jansen calls "a liberal sociology of assimilation.
Assimilation impacts formal and informal ethnic distinctives for both the outsider and the host culture.
Assimilation typically assumes a number of common forms.
Indifferent inclusion is neither a defence nor a denunciation of assimilation, but something more interesting and subtle: a history of the concept as it morphed and migrated through varying theatres of public culture, political debate and governance.
Although there are several studies about the midday depression in CO2 assimilation in field crops (Wang et al.
Marzel called on Jews in Israel to wake up before "what happens abroad, where every second Jew assimilates, arrives in Israel," in a reference to the remarkably high assimilation rates in America and Europe.
Downward assimilation has been described as specific vulnerabilities that increase the risk of falling onto a downward path and into a permanent underclass (Portes & Rumbaut, 2001; Portes & Zhou, 1993).
Assimilation of the atlas may be partial or complete.
The training kit included topics pertaining to introducing the Equal Opportunities Units (EOUs), the concept of assimilation of women's needs in development, invitation skills, garnering support aimed to pave the way for EOUs to function in the various governmental ministries and departments.