assimilate

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assimilate

(ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. assimi·lated, assimi·lating, assimi·lates
v.tr.
Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

[əsim′əlāt]
Etymology: L, assimilare, to make alike
1 to absorb nutritive substances from the digestive tract to the circulatory system and convert them into living tissues.
2 to incorporate components of a new culture into existing values.

assimilate

(ă-sim′ĭ-lāt″) [L. assimilare, to make like, liken]
1. To absorb digested food.
2. In psychology, to absorb newly perceived information into the existing subjective conscious structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike galls on intact leaflets, crescent galls that had their leaflet blades removed (simulating insect herbivory) drew assimilates from distal leaflets on the same leaf when tested in October.
We demonstrated, for the first time, that interspecific exploitative competition for plant assimilates occurs between two aphid-induced sinks.
However, there is no reason to doubt that when the crescent galls cohabit with spherical galls on any tree, competition for assimilates is the mechanism behind the (often observed) mortality of the crescent galls.
1985), facilitating the movement of assimilates among mature leaflets and leaves, a phenomenon that does not occur in ungalled Pistacia shoots (Takeda et al.
The fact that the spherical and crescent gall makers competed for phloem assimilates is illustrated by our finding that both species' galls imported less assimilates when they cohabited than when they did not [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 4 OMITTED].
In this study we measured the flow of assimilates to the gall sink via the phloem.
Preliminary studies on the translocation of 14C-labelled assimilates and 32P[O.
Colony size of Tuberolachnus salignus (Gmelin) in relation to mass transport of 14C-labelled assimilates from the leaves in willow.
Sinks as determinants of assimilates partitioning: possible sites for regulation.