assimilable

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as·sim·i·la·ble

(ă-sim'i-lă-bil),
Capable of undergoing assimilation. See: assimilation.

assimilable

(ă-sim′ĭ-lă-bl) [L. assimilabilis]
Capable of assimilation.
assimilability (-sim″ĭ-lă-bil′it-ē)
References in periodicals archive ?
all be rough proxies for assimilability, but the best evidence may
homogeneity no longer served as a reliable proxy for assimilability.
Musical theatre offered Jews a showcase in which they could demonstrate--perform--their assimilability.
Such language is significant since it draws directly from the ruling in Thind, in which the Supreme Court denied citizenship to Thind on the grounds of assimilability.
This chapter is particularly notable for its attention to the complexity of race thinking during this era, as it was deployed to determine "model" immigrants, both for their labour habits and their assimilability to French cultural norms, and to distinguish them from the unassimilable colonized subjects of the empire.
Paying particular attention to the differences in the way Asian man/white woman dyads and white man/Asian woman dyads signified differing representations of Asian assimilability, she looks at John Luther Long's "Madame Butterfly," D.
Eric Goldstein's essay presents various aspects of the Progressive Era debate on the assimilability of the Jews into American society.
Recently, however, recognition of the historical abuses of the assimilability index has contributed to the rise of the multiculturalism movement, whose proponents argue that the old "melting pot" social metaphor, which privileges the erosion of cultural distinctness in the dominant cultural stew, is obsolete and at times discriminatory.
One of the most significant attempts to argue for Jews' assimilability into white America was made by Nathaniel Shaler, the dean of Harvard's Lawrence Scientific School.
Another exemplar of this view was one of Shaler's former students, Theodore Roosevelt, who became a leading spokesman for Jewish assimilability.