assessment


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Related to assessment: Formative assessment, assessment tools

assessment

 [ah-ses´ment]
an appraisal or evaluation.
fetal assessment see fetal assessment.
focused assessment a highly specific assessment performed on patients in the emergency department, focusing on the system or systems involved in the patient's problem.
functional assessment an objective review of an individual's mobility, transfer skills, and activities of daily living, including self care, sphincter control, mobility, locomotion, and communication. It is used to establish a baseline, to predict rehabilitation outcomes, to evaluate therapeutic interventions, and for standardizing communication for research purposes.
lethality assessment a systematic method of assessing a patient's suicide potential.
neurologic assessment see neurologic assessment.
nursing assessment see nursing assessment.
primary assessment a rapid, initial examination of a patient to recognize and manage all immediate life-threatening conditions. Called also primary survey.
secondary assessment a continuation of the primary assessment, where the medical professional obtains vital signs, reassesses changes in the patient's condition, and performs appropriate physical examinations.

as·sess·ment

(ă-ses'ment),
1. Evaluation of the patient using selected skills of history-taking; physical examination, laboratory, imaging, and social evaluation, to achieve a specific goal.
2. Appraisal or analysis of conditions, disorders, data, or a patient's overall state.
[M.E. assessen, eto evaluate, fr. Med.L. assideo, pp. assessus, to sit in judgment, as to estimate a charge or apportion a tax]

assessment

[əses′mənt]
Etymology: L, assidere, to sit beside
1 (in medicine and nursing) an evaluation or appraisal of a condition.
2 the process of making such an evaluation.
3 (in a problem-oriented medical record) an examiner's evaluation of the disease or condition based on the patient's subjective report of the symptoms and course of the illness or condition and the examiner's objective findings, including data obtained through laboratory tests, physical examination, medical history, and information reported by family members and other health care team members. See also nursing assessment, problem-oriented medical record. assess, v.

assessment

Graduate educationUK A systematic procedure for measuring a trainee's progress or level of achievement against defined criteria to make a judgement about him or her.
MedspeakUK The evaluation of a person at the point of first contact with health and social services, during which time information is collected to identify the patient’s needs and formulate a treatment plan.
Psychiatry See Evaluation.

assessment

Medtalk Evaluation. See Exposure assessment, Functional assessment, Nutritional assessment, Probabalistic safety assessment, Process assessment, Quality assessment, Quantitative risk assessment, Risk assessment.

as·sess·ment

(ă-ses'mĕnt)
1. Synonym(s): evaluation.
2. Synthesis of clinical findings into a clear understanding of presenting conditions that inform treatment strategies.
3. The part of a medical record, typically a SOAP (q.v.) note, when the patient's complaint, diagnosis, and prognosis are recorded.
[M.E. assessen, to evaluate, fr. Med.L. assideo, pp. assessus, to sit in judgment, as to estimate a charge or apportion a tax]

assessment

review and examination of the patient, the presenting condition and all aspects of the history to facilitate formulation of the diagnosis and treatment plan

assessment,

n 1. in clinical medicine, evaluation of the patient for the purposes of forming a diagnosis and plan of treatment.
2. in research, evaluation of a treatment or diagnostic test through experiment and measurement.

as·sess·ment

(ă-ses'mĕnt)
Evaluation of the patient using selected skills of history-taking; physical examination, laboratory, imaging, and social evaluation, to achieve a specific goal.
[M.E. assessen, to evaluate, fr. Med.L. assideo, pp. assessus, to sit in judgment, as to estimate a charge or apportion a tax]

assessment,

n the qualified opinion of a healthcare provider, informed by patient feedback and examination results, with regard to a specific health issue, whether critical, pending, or routine.
assessment, extraoral,
n a preliminary examination of the head, neck, and face, usually made in conjunction with an intraoral examination, to recognize anomalies that might impact the patient's health; may require observation, listening, touch, and smell.
assessment, risk,
n process of evaluating a potential hazard, likelihood of suffering, or any adverse effects.
assessment stroke,
n the light movement of an instrument against a tooth to detect calculus, caries, overhangs, or other surface irregularities; the movement of a probe to determine pocket depth. Also called
exploratory stroke.

assessment

the critical analysis and evaluation or judgment of the status or quality of a particular condition, situation, or other subject of appraisal. For example—clinical assessment of a patient's condition as a prerequisite to making a prognosis.

Patient discussion about assessment

Q. Regarding risk-factor assessment? Hello, I am……….., I heard ACSM has recently issued a new edition of its exercise guidelines. Were any changes made regarding risk-factor assessment?

A. Are you fitness professional? I understand that you are very much interested in food guidelines. It can be difficult to keep up with the latest guidelines and standards. This is particularly true this year, which has seen new USDA Food Guidelines in January, a revised Food Pyramid in May and, most recently, the release of the 7th edition of ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. The good news is that the ACSM risk factors have been minimally revised. For your reference, here is a summary of what has and has not changed for the 2006 edition.

Q. assessment of down syndrom

A. down syndrome is a very easy diagnosis - it just need a chromosome check and seeing 3 (instead 2) chromosomes number 21. -

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/disorders/whataregd/down/

More discussions about assessment
References in periodicals archive ?
6501(c) (4), the Service and a taxpayer can agree in writing to extend the period for assessment, as long as the agreement is entered into before the expiration of the assessment period.
Methods of effective teaching and assessment in higher education are also located in this issue.
This agreement extends our universe into the formative assessment arena.
Like an analysis, a storage assessment examines your current budget and then balances that budget against the maximum value of the item purchased.
Last year, she paid $1,300, but, had Carter not appealed her assessment, she would have paid $1,600.
High-rise condominiums recorded the highest median monthly assessment among all condominium types, increasing 14.
A multifaceted approach to assessment helps Pipkin and her colleagues devise an appropriate plan to meet that goal for all kids.
After the assessment team completes the initial meetings and job description process, they conduct a job analysis.
Special attention will be paid to the assessment phase of this tested, proven and effective method.
We believe that the intent of the new relieving provision is to accord the benefit of offsetting of over- and under-payments of tax liability in respect of all taxable periods that are open for assessment or reassessment for amounts owed by, or refundable to, taxpayers as of and after December 31, 1999.
Vocational evaluation will evolve in two major service directions: 1) career assessment and development, and 2) community-based assessment.
16 in a perpetual assessment approved by voters in 1979, which raises $105 million annually to maintain 450 miles of drainage channels in the county.

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