assertive


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Related to assertive: assertive behavior

assertive

MedspeakUK Referring to clear, honest and direct communication, without avoiding issues or resorting to manipulative or aggressive behaviour.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assertive people focus on facts and the positives in life rather than the negatives.
Alden, Safran, and Weidman (1978) stated the importance during counseling of distinguishing between assertive, aggressive, and non-aggressive behaviors due to the tendency for women to associate assertiveness and aggression with masculinity.
The blind group of individuals were found to be significantly more assertive than the other disability groups; substance abusers, deaf, spinal cord injured, cardiac disabled, orthopedically disabled, mentally retarded, and neurologically disabled.
Says Michael Tusch, CEO Apical: "We are proud to support Vertu's latest pioneering smartphones in providing, via Assertive Display, a viewing experience that not only offers seamless quality but is comfortable for the eye.
The latest addition to the great viewing capabilities on a Lumia smartphone is demonstrated on the Nokia Lumia 1520 where Assertive Display nicely complements the ClearBlack promise of being able to see more anywhere, anytime - even in a bright environment.
While people were negative about assertive black men and white women, black women had as much latitude as white men to be assertive.
We have to "retrain" difficult people by modeling assertive behavior for them and letting them know that we need to be treated in a positive manner.
To simplify the process, investigators can consider three of the most common types of sexual aggressor rapists: Power reassurance, power assertive, and anger retaliatory.
The effects of assertive training on the performance self-esteem of adolescent girls.
While Rorty takes this in an anti-philosophical direction (to which Cahoone objects) by way of a reading of Derrida (to which Cahoone further objects), Buchler works with it so as to widen the notion of judgment and truth to include not only assertive and pragmatic truth but even exhibitive truth, which becomes central for Cahoone.
Once again, though, she is right about the mid-century watershed: with the Restoration came the beginning of that gradual decline in the intensity of fears of witches and other criminal or assertive women that continued into the eighteenth century.