assault

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assault

[əsôlt′]
Etymology: L, assilirere, to leap upon
1 an unlawful act that places another person, without that person's consent, in fear of immediate bodily harm or battery.
2 the act of committing an assault.
3 to threaten a person with bodily harm or injury. See battery.

assault

The unlawful placing of an individual in apprehension of immediate bodily harm without his or her consent.

assault

Forensic medicine The unlawful placing of an individual in apprehension of immediate bodily harm without his/her consent. See Sexual assault, Nonsexual genital assault.

assault/interpersonal violence

A social act involving a serious abuse of power, consisting of the exertion of physical force and power over another individual with the intent of controlling, disempowering and/or injuring that individual. See Domestic violence.

assault,

n an intentional, unlawful offer of bodily injury to another by force or unlawfully directing force toward another person to create a reasonable fear of imminent danger, coupled with the apparent ability to do the harm threatened if not prevented. A completed assault is a battery. In a medical setting, the unconsented touching of the body would be an assault and battery.

Patient discussion about assault

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More discussions about assault
References in periodicals archive ?
19) In November 2008, assaulters struck Pentagon computers, seeking "remotely to take control of computers and rifle their files.
She also denied earlier reports stating that she had jumped out of the window, saying that she had been thrown out by her assaulters.
nurture dilemma, leading me to question how to classify the more than 100 weekly assaulters in the School District of Philadelphia.
The authors' findings focus on information from investigative reports; forensic evidence; and interviews with the killers, assaulters, and surviving officers as related to traffic pursuits and stops.
As the roar of departing rotor blades filled the sky, commando assaulters cleared four separate compounds in search of their elusive quarry.
If there's any other woman going through what I went through," she said, "I would strongly encourage them to do what they can to get their assaulters put away.
Made up of special operations assaulters, support personnel and specialists, and special operations coxswain
Wife assaulters reported the greatest anger and anxiety (including high physiological responses such as increased heart rate) from the scenarios in general and the highest ratings of all for the abandonment scenes.
44) The commission of a criminal assault, then, reflects an improper valuation of the victim, and the same holds, says Kahan, of hate criminals: "Like assaulters relative to negligent jostlers, and rapists relative to assaulters, hate criminals relative to other types of violent criminals are--in the law's eyes--making an even bigger mistake about the objective worth of their victims.
Similarly, the focus on men as assaulters has resulted in little study of women as sexual assaulters of men (Anderson & Struckman-Johnson, 1998; Struckman-Johnson, Struckman-Johnson, & Anderson, 2003).
precedents to liken him to true recidivist assaulters.
With respect to their personal experiences, sexual assaulters were more likely than other men to have experienced abuse or violence as a child, to have been delinquent in adolescence, to have peers who viewed forced sex as acceptable, and to have had early and frequent dating and sexual experiences.