aspirin-induced asthma

aspirin-induced asthma

A condition characterised by a triad of asthma, aspirin sensitivity and nasal polyps, affecting up to 10% of asthmatics and usually presenting by age 30 to 40. A single dose of aspirin or, less commonly, other NSAIDs can provoke an acute asthmatic attack with rhinorrhoea, conjunctival irritation, and flushing of the head and neck due to post-exposure increase of eosinophil and secretion of cysteinyl leukotrienes.

Management
Avoid trigger agents; leukotriene antagonists may help.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) was first described by Widal et al (13) in 1922 and later by Samter and Beers (14) in 1967.
Antileukotrienes are particularly useful in controlling asthma resulting from certain triggers, including exercise-induced asthma, aspirin-induced asthma and, to a lesser extent, allergen-induced asthma.
In aspirin-induced asthma, cysteine-leukotriene release into airways (3, 4) is associated with increased concentrations of leukotriene C4 synthase, the enzyme that forms leukotriene C4 [for review, see Ref.
The researchers said: 'A greater understanding of aspirin-induced asthma is desirable, given the trend for consumers to self- prescribe and the lack of association by many between asthma and some analgaesics.
Dr Costello said deaths from aspirin-induced asthma were relatively small but it had the potential to be fatal.
The latest research, published in the British Medical Journal, analysed 21 past studies of asthmatic patients and concluded that the prevalence of aspirin-induced asthma was 21pc in adults and 5pc in children.
Increased excretion of leukotriene FA during aspirin-induced asthma.
Only about 15%-20% of the population seeking arthritis pain treatment met the criteria for receiving a selective COX-2, which included having a history of GI bleeding, major ulcerative disease, major inflammatory bowel disease, current use of warfarin, or a history of aspirin-induced asthma, which is a contraindication for conventional NSAID use.
A new paper published in the British Medical Journal today has revealed that the prevalence of aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is higher than previously thought.
LTRAs appear to be particularly useful for the treatment of asthma in children, for asthmatic patients with allergic rhinitis, for the treatment of exercise-induced asthma and for aspirin-induced asthma.

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