aspiration

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aspiration

 [as″pĭ-ra´shun]
inhalation of some foreign material; aspiration of vomitus, blood, or mucus may occur when a person is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic, and can be avoided by keeping the head turned to the side and removing all such foreign material from the air passages.
A, Types of aspiration. A, Aspiration before swallow caused by reduced tongue control. B, Aspiration before swallow caused by absent swallow response. C, Aspiration during swallow caused by reduced laryngeal closure. D Aspiration after swallow caused by pooled material in pyriform sinuses overflowing into airway. From Logemann J: Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders, San Diego, College-Hill Press, 1983.
withdrawal of fluid by an aspirator; the method is widely used in hospitals, especially during surgery, to drain the area of the body being operated on and keep it clear of excess blood and other fluids to facilitate visualization of the surgical field. Sometimes after extensive surgery, suction drainage under the skin is used to speed the healing process.
meconium aspiration inhalation of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
risk for aspiration a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual is at risk for entry of gastric secretions, oropharyngeal secretions, solids, or fluids into the tracheobronchial passage.
vacuum aspiration a form of induced abortion in which the uterine contents are removed by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.

as·pi·ra·tion

(as'pi-rā'shŭn),
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
3. A surgical technique for cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]

aspiration

/as·pi·ra·tion/ (as″pĭ-ra´shun)
1. the drawing of a foreign substance, such as the gastric contents, into the respiratory tract during inhalation.
2. removal by suction, as the removal of fluid or gas from a body cavity or the procurement of biopsy specimens.

meconium aspiration  aspiration of meconium by the fetus or newborn, which may result in atelectasis, emphysema, pneumothorax, or pneumonia.
microsurgical epididymal sperm aspiration  (MESA) retrieval of sperm from the epididymis using microsurgical techniques, done in men with obstructive azoospermia.
vacuum aspiration  removal of the uterine contents by application of a vacuum through a hollow curet or a cannula introduced into the uterus.

aspiration

(ăs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of breathing in; inhalation.
b. The act of drawing something, as liquid or a foreign object, into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine The process of removing fluids or gases from the body with a suction device.

aspiration

[as′pirā′shən]
1 drawing in or out by suction.
2 the act of withdrawing a fluid, such as mucus or serum, from the body by a suction device. See also aspiration pneumonia. aspirate, n.
3 the misdirection of food or liquid into the trachea and airway during swallowing.

aspiration

1. Aspiration.
2. The withdrawal of fluid from a body cavity or a mass–eg a cyst with a needle and a syringe by suction or siphonage, such as a syringe. See Gastric aspiration, Paracentesis.

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas or fluid from a body cavity, from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. Inhalation into the airways of fluid or foreign body (e.g., vomitus, food, fluid).
3. A surgical technique for treatment of cataract, requiring a small corneal incision, severance of the lens capsule, fragmentation of the lens material, and removal with a needle.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]

aspiration

Drawing out of fluid by suction, usually by syringe and needle, but sometimes by mouth or pump suction through a plastic or rubber tube.

Aspiration

When solids or liquids that should be swallowed into the stomach are instead breathed into the respiratory system, or when substances from the outside environment are accidentally breathed into the lungs.

aspiration

(1) intervention to suck out fluid from somewhere in the body, e.g. excess synovial fluid from a swollen joint or blood from a haematoma; (2) inhalation of liquid into the lungs, as when vomit is sucked into the airway from the pharynx in an unconscious accident victim. See also recovery position.

aspiration

removal of fluid by suction, e.g. to obtain a sample of synovial fluid via a hypodermic needle

aspiration

momentary syringe plunger reduction/draw back on syringe plunger, to demonstrate that the needle tip is not located within a blood vessel (see local anaesthetic; self-aspirating syringe)

as·pi·ra·tion

(aspir-āshŭn)
1. Removal, by suction, of a gas, fluid, or tissue from a body cavity or organ from unusual accumulations, or from a container.
2. The inspiratory sucking into the airways of fluid or any foreign material, especially gastric contents or food.
[L. aspiratio, fr. aspiro, to breathe on]

aspiration (as´pirā´shən),

n 1. the act of breathing or drawing in.
n 2. the removal of fluids, gases, or solids from a cavity by means of a vacuum pump.
aspiration biopsy,
n See aspiration, fine needle (FNA).
aspiration, fine needle (FNA),
n the procedure of obtaining a biopsy specimen by aspiration through a needle; used for diagnosing bone or deep soft tissue lesions. Also known as a
needle biopsy.
aspiration pneumonia,
n pneumonia produced by aspiration of foreign material into the lungs.

aspiration

1. the act of inhaling. Pathological aspiration of vomitus or mucus into the respiratory tract may occur when a patient is unconscious or under the effects of a general anesthetic.
2. removal of fluids or gases from a cavity by the aid of suction.

aspiration biopsy
see biopsy.
aspiration pneumonia
is the result of inhalation or aspiration of infected solid or liquid material into the lungs. Large volumes of aspirate cause asphyxia, smaller amounts cause a necrotic or gangrenous pneumonia, in anterior and ventral parts of the lung. There is profound toxemia, cough, gurgling or squeaky rales, and usually an attendant pleurisy producing a friction rub. Called also inhalation pneumonia.

Patient discussion about aspiration

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about aspiration
References in classic literature ?
This same Casildea, then, that I speak of, requited my honourable passion and gentle aspirations by compelling me, as his stepmother did Hercules, to engage in many perils of various sorts, at the end of each promising me that, with the end of the next, the object of my hopes should be attained; but my labours have gone on increasing link by link until they are past counting, nor do I know what will be the last one that is to be the beginning of the accomplishment of my chaste desires.
Nothing could stem the flood of my ecstatic aspirations.
Dreams, aspirations, hopes, the past, the sordid exchange.
It was thus rather the exacting nature of my aspirations than any particular degradation in my faults, that made me what I was, and, with even a deeper trench than in the majority of men, severed in me those provinces of good and ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.
And during these few revolutions all the activity, all the traditions, the complex organizations, the nations, languages, literatures, aspirations, even the mere memory of Man as I knew him, had been swept out of existence.
But that is Nature's way: she will allow a gentleman of splendid physiognomy and poetic aspirations to sing woefully out of tune, and not give him the slightest hint of it; and takes care that some narrow-browed fellow, trolling a ballad in the corner of a pot-house, shall be as true to his intervals as a bird.
You leave the recollection of Hunsden as a bee would a rock, as a bird a desert; and your aspirations spread eager wings towards a land of visions where, now in advancing daylight--in X daylight--you dare to dream of congeniality, repose, union.
True, these were childish fancies and aspirations, but who knows but that I might meet Polina, and be able to tell her everything, and see her look of surprise at the fact that I had overcome so many adverse strokes of fortune.
His only aspirations were to hold out at poker, at his club, to know the names of all the cocottes, to shake hands all round, to ply his rosy gullet with truffles and champagne, and to create uncomfortable eddies and obstructions among the constituent atoms of the American colony.
Ye deemed them holier than yourselves, and shrank from your own sin, contrasting it with their lives of righteousness and prayerful aspirations heavenward.
Such a fearful disillusionment, such a blasting of life-long hopes and aspirations, such an uprooting of age-old tradition might have excused a vastly greater demonstration on the part of the Thark.
But if they are states at all, they embody some common conception of the good, some common aspirations of all their members.