aspirate

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Related to aspirates: aspiration, aspirated, sputum

aspirate

 [as´pĭ-rāt]
1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction; see aspiration (def. 3).
2. the fluid withdrawn this way.

as·pi·rate

(as'pi-rāt),
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, give the H sound]

aspirate

(ăs′pə-rāt′)
tr.v. aspi·rated, aspi·rating, aspi·rates
1. To draw (liquid or a foreign object, for example) into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine
a. To remove (a liquid or gas) from the body by aspiration.
b. To suction (a body part or growth, for example) for the removal of a liquid or gas.
n. (-pər-ĭt)
Medicine Matter removed by aspiration.

aspirate

[-rāt]
Etymology: L, aspirare, to breathe upon
1 to withdraw fluid or air from a cavity. The process is usually aided by use of a syringe or a suction device. See paracentesis, thoracentesis.
2 when all or part of a food/liquid bolus enters the airway.
3 (in phonetics) a release of air.

aspirate

Lab medicine
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for transport to the lab (e.g., syringe), or analysis (as in a lab instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyser). 

Orthopaedics
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure from a joint—e.g., to reduce intra-articular pressure.

Respiratory medicine
noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst.

verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia.

aspirate

To suck in Chest medicine noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia Clinical medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure from a joint–eg, to ↓ pressure Lab medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for storage—eg syringe, or for analysis—as in a laboratory instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyzer

as·pi·rate

1. (as'pi-rāt) To remove by aspiration.
2. (as'pi-rit) The substance removed by aspiration.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

Aspirate

The removal by suction of a fluid from a body cavity using a needle.

as·pi·rate

(as'pir-āt)
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

aspirate (as´pirāt),

v 1. to draw or breathe in.
v 2. to remove materials by vacuum.
n 3. a phonetic unit whose identifying characteristic is the sound generated by the passage of air through a relatively open channel; the sound of
h; a sound followed by or combined with the sound of
h.
Enlarge picture
Aspergillosis.

aspirate

1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction.
2. the fluid obtained by aspiration.

Patient discussion about aspirate

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about aspirate
References in periodicals archive ?
The rate of malignancy reported in these benign aspirates represents incidental carcinomas found in the resection specimen and not the false-negative rate of a benign diagnosis on thyroid aspiration.
Respiratory syncytial virus was detected by immunoassay in 25 specimens obtained by flocked swabbing and in 21 nasopharyngeal aspirates.
One study investigated the use of visual inspection of feeding tube aspirates in identifying feeding tube location in the respiratory or GI tracts.
For example, investigators found that 18 gastric aspirates from tube-fed children had a mean pH of 5 (range from 3.
If at all possible all aspirates should be performed with the patient lying down
Hospital protocol was for lymph node aspirates to be obtained at the bedside by using sterile technique and large-bore needle at the point of maximal swelling.
All had nasal aspirate and acute and convalescent serum specimens collected.
If only a very few abnormal cells were present, a definite diagnosis was not rendered, and the aspirates were classified as suspicious for malignancy.
With the continuing evolution of microarray technologies and of the various dissection technologies enabling analysis of highly homogenous biological samples, researchers are finding an increasing need to work with samples comprised of low numbers of cells such as microdissected biopsies, fine-needle aspirates, sorted cells, and embryonic structures.
Pathologists also looked for occult metastases in bone marrow aspirates from 3 413 women in the same cohort.
DNA was extracted from the nasopharyngeal aspirates with a QIAamp DNA Blood Mini Kit (Qiagen GmbH, Hilden, Germany).