aspirate

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aspirate

 [as´pĭ-rāt]
1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction; see aspiration (def. 3).
2. the fluid withdrawn this way.

as·pi·rate

(as'pi-rāt),
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, give the H sound]

aspirate

(ăs′pə-rāt′)
tr.v. aspi·rated, aspi·rating, aspi·rates
1. To draw (liquid or a foreign object, for example) into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine
a. To remove (a liquid or gas) from the body by aspiration.
b. To suction (a body part or growth, for example) for the removal of a liquid or gas.
n. (-pər-ĭt)
Medicine Matter removed by aspiration.

aspirate

[-rāt]
Etymology: L, aspirare, to breathe upon
1 to withdraw fluid or air from a cavity. The process is usually aided by use of a syringe or a suction device. See paracentesis, thoracentesis.
2 when all or part of a food/liquid bolus enters the airway.
3 (in phonetics) a release of air.

aspirate

Lab medicine
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for transport to the lab (e.g., syringe), or analysis (as in a lab instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyser). 

Orthopaedics
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure from a joint—e.g., to reduce intra-articular pressure.

Respiratory medicine
noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst.

verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia.

aspirate

To suck in Chest medicine noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia Clinical medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure from a joint–eg, to ↓ pressure Lab medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for storage—eg syringe, or for analysis—as in a laboratory instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyzer

as·pi·rate

1. (as'pi-rāt) To remove by aspiration.
2. (as'pi-rit) The substance removed by aspiration.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

Aspirate

The removal by suction of a fluid from a body cavity using a needle.

as·pi·rate

(as'pir-āt)
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

aspirate (as´pirāt),

v 1. to draw or breathe in.
v 2. to remove materials by vacuum.
n 3. a phonetic unit whose identifying characteristic is the sound generated by the passage of air through a relatively open channel; the sound of
h; a sound followed by or combined with the sound of
h.
Enlarge picture
Aspergillosis.

aspirate

1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction.
2. the fluid obtained by aspiration.

Patient discussion about aspirate

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about aspirate
References in periodicals archive ?
Given these results, one may wonder whether any nodule smaller than 1 cm should be aspirated.
Always perform a minimum of 2 needle passes, unless fluid or purulent material is aspirated with the first pass; always use a sterile needle and syringe for each pass
Analysis of all patients who aspirated without a protective cough reflex (silent aspiration; Figure 2) indicated that the highest silent aspiration rates occurred with brain cancer (9/11, 81.
The base naturally aspirated version of the engine features a cast iron block and aluminum cylinder head; the block frame has been hollowed out to reduce weight.
2001), and no information are available on the direct use of oocytes aspirated from superovulated rabbit ovarian follicles in rabbit SCNT.
3) Because foreign body aspiration continues to be a potentially life-threatening occurrence in early childhood, the authors carried out a comparison of foreign bodies removed at University of North Carolina hospitals in order to identify whether trends could be observed in the nature of objects being aspirated.
Languages that have both aspirated stops and the phoneme /h/ frequently manifest a close parallel in their distribution.
2 normally aspirated HOW MUCH: pounds 47,400 for the R/pounds 36,000 for the normally aspirated version HOW QUICK?
Each smoke detector array consisted of a number of detectors including photoelectric, ionization, photo/ion combination, aspirated, carbon monoxide, and mechanical heat sensor.
Donations are sought from mothers who give birth, after a full term, by cesarean section; the fluid is aspirated out of the amniotic sac just before delivery.
Shelby Expands 2011 Shelby GT350 Line with Normally Aspirated Model
Production will be limited to 60 new Mopar Dodge Challenger Drag Pak vehicles - 35 with the first-ever supercharged engine from Mopar and 25 with a naturally aspirated 426 HEMI engine