aspirate


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Related to aspirate: aspiration pneumonia

aspirate

 [as´pĭ-rāt]
1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction; see aspiration (def. 3).
2. the fluid withdrawn this way.

as·pi·rate

(as'pi-rāt),
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, give the H sound]

aspirate

(ăs′pə-rāt′)
tr.v. aspi·rated, aspi·rating, aspi·rates
1. To draw (liquid or a foreign object, for example) into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
2. Medicine
a. To remove (a liquid or gas) from the body by aspiration.
b. To suction (a body part or growth, for example) for the removal of a liquid or gas.
n. (-pər-ĭt)
Medicine Matter removed by aspiration.

aspirate

[-rāt]
Etymology: L, aspirare, to breathe upon
1 to withdraw fluid or air from a cavity. The process is usually aided by use of a syringe or a suction device. See paracentesis, thoracentesis.
2 when all or part of a food/liquid bolus enters the airway.
3 (in phonetics) a release of air.

aspirate

Lab medicine
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for transport to the lab (e.g., syringe), or analysis (as in a lab instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyser). 

Orthopaedics
verb To draw a fluid under negative pressure from a joint—e.g., to reduce intra-articular pressure.

Respiratory medicine
noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst.

verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia.

aspirate

To suck in Chest medicine noun Fluid withdrawn from a cyst verb To inhale foreign fluid or semi-fluid material, in particular gastric content into the upper respiratory tract, resulting in aspiration pneumonia Clinical medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure from a joint–eg, to ↓ pressure Lab medicine The drawing of a fluid under negative pressure into a receptacle for storage—eg syringe, or for analysis—as in a laboratory instrument that aspirates material being tested on a batch analyzer

as·pi·rate

1. (as'pi-rāt) To remove by aspiration.
2. (as'pi-rit) The substance removed by aspiration.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

Aspirate

The removal by suction of a fluid from a body cavity using a needle.

as·pi·rate

(as'pir-āt)
1. To remove by aspiration.
2. To inhale into the airways foreign particulate material, such as vomitus.
3. Foreign body, food, gastric contents, or fluid, including saliva, which is inhaled.
[L. a-spiro, pp. -atus, to breathe on, make the H sound]

aspirate (as´pirāt),

v 1. to draw or breathe in.
v 2. to remove materials by vacuum.
n 3. a phonetic unit whose identifying characteristic is the sound generated by the passage of air through a relatively open channel; the sound of
h; a sound followed by or combined with the sound of
h.
Enlarge picture
Aspergillosis.

aspirate

1. to withdraw fluid by negative pressure, or suction.
2. the fluid obtained by aspiration.

Patient discussion about aspirate

Q. What Causes Aspiration Pneumonia? My father is hospitalized with aspiration pneumonia. What causes this?

A. Aspiration pneumonia is a pneumonia that develops due to the entrance of foreign material that enter the bronchial tree (air tubes), usually oral or gastric contents (including food, saliva, or nasal secretions). Aspiration pneumonia represents a either a bacterial infection or a chemical inflammatory process due to inadequate swallowing mechanism.

More discussions about aspirate
References in periodicals archive ?
8220;The Bio-MAC Bone Marrow Aspiration Catheter makes marrow harvesting much easier for clinicians and increases access of bone marrow aspirate for the patients, while decreasing the complication and pain associated with other current bone marrow harvesting devices,” states Dr.
2 Current guidelines recommend that patients with a CPIS >6 should be treated empirically with antimicrobial therapy that covers those pathogens most likely to cause early (<5 days) or late (>5 days) VAP, (11) and that an endobronchial aspirate or bronchoalveolar lavage should be performed at the same time to obtain samples for quantitative cultures.
Four studies made use of a variety of cutoff points based on the biochemical measurement parameters of feeding tube aspirates for differentiating respiratory from GI placement of feeding tubes.
An exception to this rule is patients with small supraclavicular nodes, where it is safer to aspirate patients in the sitting position
All patients were eligible who had an aspirate of a noninguinal lymph node or pleural fluid sent for mycobacterial culture and DST during September 1, 2006-December 31, 2008, from the district hospital in rural Tugela Ferry, South Africa.
Variables included in the study were (a) length of tubing extending from the insertion site, (b) volume of aspirate from the feeding tube, (c) appearance of the aspirate, and (d) pH of the aspirate.
Cell block preparations, core biopsies obtained at the time of the FNAB in some cases, and the ancillary studies performed were also evaluated and correlated with the aspirate smears before giving a final diagnosis, especially in aspirates that were very paucicellular.
The PowrSyringe Aspirator allows clinicians to aspirate with one hand while their other hand controls an imaging probe, catheter, biopsy needle, or other related device.
Microscopy and a culture from the aspirate showed a cryptococcal isolate.
The aspirate was evaluated by Gram's stain, aerobic and anaerobic cultures, and Warthin-Starry silver staining (figure 3).
All had nasal aspirate and acute and convalescent serum specimens collected.