aspartame


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Related to aspartame: Acesulfame potassium

aspartame

 [ah-spar´tām]
a synthetic compound of two amino acids, used as a low-calorie sweetener. It is 180 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar); the amount equal in sweetness to a teaspoon of sugar contains 0.1 calorie. Aspartame does not promote the formation of dental caries. The amount of phenylalanine it contains must be taken into account in the low-phenylalanine diet of patients with phenylketonuria.

aspartame

/as·par·tame/ (ah-spahr´tām) (as´pahr-tām″) an artificial sweetener about 200 times as sweet as sucrose and used as a low-calorie sweetener.

aspartame

(ăs′pər-tām′, ə-spär′-)
n.
An artificial sweetener, C14H18N2O5, whose metabolic breakdown products include aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It must be avoided by people with phenylketonuria.

aspartame

[aspär′tām, as′pərtām]
a white, almost odorless crystalline powder that is used as an artificial sweetener. It is formed by binding the amino acids of phenylalanine and aspartic acid. Approximately 180 times as sweet as the same amount of sucrose, it is used mostly to sweeten cold or uncooked foods. Unprotected aspartame tends to lose its sweetness in the presence of heat, moisture, and alkaline media. Excessive use of this nonnutritive sweetener should be avoided by patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) because the substance hydrolyzes to form aspartate and phenylalanine.
An artificial sweetener that is a dipeptide ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine, which was discovered in 1965 and approved by the FDA in 1983; it may be safer than saccharin except in patients with phenylketonuria
Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts—mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, and possibly brain cancer

aspartame

Nutrasweet® An artificial sweetener/ester of aspartic acid and phenylalanine; it may be safer than saccharin except in Pts with phenylketonuria Adverse reactions Rare, with large amounts–mild depression, headaches, insomnia, loss of motor control, nausea, seizures, etc, and possibly brain cancer. See Artificial sweeteners. Cf Aspartate, Cyclamate.

aspartame

An artificial sweetener derived from aspartic acid and phenylalanine.

as·par·tame

(aspĕr-tām)
Methyl-aspartylphenylalanine, a synthetic dipeptide with a high sweetness index but very low caloric content used as an artificial sweetner for some foods and beverages.

aspartame (as´pərtām),

n brand name: NutriSweet, a low-calorie sweetening agent about 200 times as sweet as sucrose.

aspartame

a synthetic compound of two amino acids (l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine o-methyl ester) used as sweetener in low-calorie drinks. It is 180 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar); the amount equal in sweetness to a teaspoon of sugar contains 0.1 calorie.
References in periodicals archive ?
The issue of sudden death related to aspartame and its breakdown products has been raised a number of times, particularly among previously healthy people.
For a full accounting of the aspartame hoax (and dozens of similar cybermyths), turn to the Urban Legends Reference Pages (www.
The Department of Health regularly reviews new information on food chemical safety and has worked closely with experts before declaring aspartame safe.
The new cans will display the words "Now Aspartame Free" above the Pepsi logo.
Following a thorough review of evidence provided both by animal and human studies, experts have ruled out a potential risk of aspartame causing damage to genes and inducing cancer.
The sweetener aspartame and its breakdown products have been a matter of extensive investigation for more than 30 years including experimental animal studies, clinical research, intake and epidemiological studies and post-marketing surveillance.
Dr Alicja Mortensen, who chaired the EFSA's aspartame review panel, said that this study is a step forward in strengthening consumer confidence in the scientific underpinning of the EU food safety system and the regulation of food additives.
Thousands of adverse reactions to aspartame have been reported to the FDA, mostly concerned with abnormal brain function, brain tumors, epilepsy and Parkinson's.
Metabolic studies [4] show that aspartame when ingested is quickly broken down to its moieties, which are then absorbed, metabolized and excreted by normal pathways.
I have written to your paper before about the many people, including myself, who have reported adverse effects from the synthetic sweetener aspartame.
She said: "In diet soda, the sugar is replaced with artificial sweeteners such as aspartame which induce adverse physiological reactions and hormonal responses that can stimulate appetite and increase carbohydrate cravings, leading to weight gain.