asparagine


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Related to asparagine: aspartic acid

asparagine

 [ah-spar´ah-jēn]
the β-amide of aspartic acid, a nonessential amino acid that is also used as a culture medium for certain bacteria.

as·par·a·gine (N, Asn),

(as-par'ă-jin),
The β-amide of aspartic acid, the l-isomer is a nutritionally nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins; a diuretic.

asparagine

/as·par·a·gine/ (as-par´ah-jēn) (as-par´ah-jin) the β-amide of aspartic acid, a nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins; used in bacterial culture media. Symbols Asn and N.

asparagine

(ə-spăr′ə-jēn′)
n.
A nonessential amino acid, C4H8N2O3, that is present in large amounts in some plants, such as asparagus.

asparagine (Asn)

[aspar′əjin]
a nonessential amino acid found in many food and body proteins. It is easily hydrolyzed to aspartic acid and has diuretic properties. See also amino acid, protein.
enlarge picture
Chemical structure of asparagine

asparagine

Biochemistry A nonessential amino acid which is the β-amide of aspartic acid–AA; asparaginine assists in the neural metabolism, and when the extra amino group is removed, the resulting AA acts as an excitatory transmitter and allows it to be used interchangeably with AAs in protein building
Asparagineclick for a larger image
Fig. 52 Asparagine . Molecular structure.

asparagine (N, Asn)

one of 20 AMINO ACIDS common in proteins. It has a polar ‘R’ structure and is water soluble. The ISOELECTRIC POINT of asparagine is 5.4.

as·par·a·gine

(as-par'ă-jin)
The β-amide of aspartic acid, the l-isomer is a nutritionally nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins; a diuretic.

asparagine,

n a nonessential amino acid found in many proteins in the body.

asparagine

Asn; the β-amide of aspartic acid, a nonessential amino acid occurring in proteins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amino acids, including asparagines and glutamine, in plasma and urine of normal human subjects.
ERYtech Pharma also presented further data in a poster session, demonstrating that, in mice, when asparaginase is encapsulated in red cells, the enzyme activity is maintained and the asparagine depletion is effective even in presence of neutralizing antibodies.
This extra supply of asparagine helps leukemic cells survive treatment with asparaginase, a drug that normally would deplete their supply of this vital nutrient.
One of the isolates from a fatal infection in 2005 showed a substitution of serine 223 to asparagine, which is predicted to facilitate binding of sialosides commonly found in mammalian species (Table 1).
The fourth change (K145N), which was located within a glycosylation site, may enhance viral binding since the smaller asparagine R group is located close to the HA receptor-binding cleft (Figure 3).
Patient 4 was heterozygous for a C [right arrow] T transition at codon 85, which changes threonine 85 (ACG) to methionine (ATG) and abolishes the N-glycosylation sequon (NLT) at amino acids 83-85, preventing glycosylation of asparagine 83 ([PIZ.
Only the [beta]6-[beta]40 chain is glycosylated, retaining the two complex N-glycans linked to asparagine residues 13 and 30.
Renaissance's AR yeast strains are traditional baker's yeast with an accelerated natural ability to consume asparagine, the precursor of acrylamide found naturally in many foods.
7 IT CONTAINS high levels of the amino acid asparagine, which serves as a natural diuretic.
2] N-glycan and O-glycan N-glycans are attached to an asparagine residue, while O-glycans are found on serine or threonine residues in proteins.
An asparagine that has been associated with reduced susceptibility to amantadine and rimantadine antiviral drugs was present at position 31 in the M2 protein, but we did not detect any signature motifs associated with resistance to antivirals targeting neuraminidase.
05) between full-oil (sources 1 and 2) and de-oiled DDGS (sources 3, 4, and 5) except threonine, asparagine, and tyrosine.

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