aseptic necrosis


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necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

a·sep·tic ne·cro·sis

necrosis occurring in the absence of infection.

aseptic necrosis

Etymology: Gk, a, sepsis, without decay, nekros, dead, osis, condition
cystic and sclerotic degenerative changes in tissues. A condition in which poor blood supply to an area of bone leads to bone death. It may follow an injury in the absence of infection. See also avascular necrosis, osteonecrosis.

aseptic necrosis

Avascular necrosis, osteonecrosis Orthopedics Death of bony tissue, usually due to ischemia. See Necrosis.

a·sep·tic ne·cro·sis

(ā-sep'tik nĕ-krō'sis)
Death or decay of tissue due to local ischemia in the absence of infection.
Synonym(s): avascular necrosis.

a·sep·tic ne·cro·sis

(ā-sep'tik nĕ-krō'sis)
Necrosis occurring in the absence of infection.

necrosis

pl. necroses [Gr.] the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.

aseptic necrosis
necrosis without infection or inflammation.
caseous necrosis
necrosis in which the tissue is soft, dry and cheesy, occurring typically in tuberculosis.
central necrosis
necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis
that in which the tissue resembles cottage cheese; most often seen in tuberculosis.
coagulation necrosis
death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis
see liquefactive necrosis (below).
liquefactive necrosis
necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
moist necrosis
necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
Zenker's necrosis
hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aseptic necrosis of the cricoid: A complication of tracheal intubation.
Does this interference with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis result in aseptic necrosis and other long-term side effects?