asepsis


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Related to asepsis: surgical asepsis

asepsis

 [a-sep´sis]
1. freedom from infection or infectious material.
2. the absence of viable pathogenic organisms; see also aseptic technique. adj., adj asep´tic.(See accompanying table.)
medical asepsis the use of practices aimed at destroying pathological organisms after they leave the body; employed in the care of patients with infectious diseases to prevent reinfection of the patient and to avoid the spread of infection from one person to another. This is achieved by isolation precautions, in which the objects in the patient's environment are protected from contamination or disinfected as soon as possible after contamination.
surgical asepsis the exclusion of all microorganisms before they can enter an open surgical wound or contaminate a sterile field during surgery. See accompanying table. Measures taken include sterilization of all instruments, drapes, and all other inanimate objects that may come in contact with the surgical wound. All personnel coming in contact with the sterile field perform a surgical hand scrub with an antimicrobial agent and put on a surgical gown and gloves. Further information concerning aseptic technique and technical aspects of perioperative nursing practice can be found in the publication AORN Standards, Recommended Practices, and Guidelines, published by AORN, the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses.

a·sep·sis

(ă-sep'sis, ā-),
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (2).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

/asep·sis/ (a-sep´sis)
1. freedom from infection.
2. the prevention of contact with microorganisms.

asepsis

(ə-sĕp′sĭs, ā-)
n.
1. The state of being free of pathogenic microorganisms.
2. The process of removing pathogenic microorganisms or protecting against infection by such organisms.

asepsis

[āsep′sis]
Etymology: Gk, a, sepsis, not decay
1 the absence of germs.
2 medical asepsis, procedures used to reduce the number of microorganisms and prevent their spread. Examples include handwashing and "no touch" dressing technique.
3 surgical asepsis, procedures used to eliminate any microorganisms; sterile technique. An example is sterilization of surgical instruments. aseptic, adj.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (q.v.).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

The complete absence of all bacteria or other microorganisms capable of causing infection. Asepsis, as distinct from antisepsis, is the concept that made modern surgery possible.

asepsis

without living pathogenic microorganisms or spores

asepsis (aˈ·sepˑ·sis),

n lack of germs and germ activity; sterile.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility.
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis (əsep´sis),

n the condition of being without infection; of being free of viable pathogenic microorganisms.
asepsis, chain of,
n a series of tasks, each step of which is performed in a bacteria-free environment, which serves to maintain the sterility of the entire process.

asepsis

absence of septic matter; freedom from infection or infectious material.

surgical asepsis
refers to destruction of organisms before they enter the body. It is used in caring for open wounds and in surgical procedures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since inception, Bio-Med QC has continued to redefine industry best practices surrounding Asepsis quality assurance by appropriately applying microbiology standards to process designed for regulatory compliance.
Early days with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) made us realise how inadequate our sterile asepsis was with peritoneal dialysis.
Improve organizational outcomes through better asepsis and sterilization techniques.
difficile at this institution, including the patients' underlying states of health, their physical proximity to each other, the pattern of use of antibiotics, asepsis, and the staff's excessive workload.
The strategy is broken down into individual segments including hygiene, asepsis, barrier nursing, infections, training and surveillance.
The effect of two asepsis protocols, scion type (apical shoot tips and brachyblast), gathering season (autumn and summer) and insertion position of the scion in the ortet (apical and basal) upon the micrograft establishment and consolidation of Pinus radiata D.
It turns out that Lister himself operated in a frock coat that carried infection, and that he probably didn't have "the slightest idea as to how to implement" a policy of asepsis (227).
There is a basic review of anatomy and asepsis, followed by chapters on equipment and supplies for IV therapy, foundations of IV therapy, and starting an IV infusion.
The close of the 19th century saw the triumphs of hospital reform and asepsis and seemed to herald the final victory over hospital cross-infection.
An infection-control program should address areas such as food handling, laundry, waste disposal, employee health, pest control, visitation, asepsis, quality control, and safety.