asepsis


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Related to asepsis: surgical asepsis

asepsis

 [a-sep´sis]
1. freedom from infection or infectious material.
2. the absence of viable pathogenic organisms; see also aseptic technique. adj., adj asep´tic.(See accompanying table.)
medical asepsis the use of practices aimed at destroying pathological organisms after they leave the body; employed in the care of patients with infectious diseases to prevent reinfection of the patient and to avoid the spread of infection from one person to another. This is achieved by isolation precautions, in which the objects in the patient's environment are protected from contamination or disinfected as soon as possible after contamination.
surgical asepsis the exclusion of all microorganisms before they can enter an open surgical wound or contaminate a sterile field during surgery. See accompanying table. Measures taken include sterilization of all instruments, drapes, and all other inanimate objects that may come in contact with the surgical wound. All personnel coming in contact with the sterile field perform a surgical hand scrub with an antimicrobial agent and put on a surgical gown and gloves. Further information concerning aseptic technique and technical aspects of perioperative nursing practice can be found in the publication AORN Standards, Recommended Practices, and Guidelines, published by AORN, the Association of Perioperative Registered Nurses.

a·sep·sis

(ă-sep'sis, ā-),
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (2).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

/asep·sis/ (a-sep´sis)
1. freedom from infection.
2. the prevention of contact with microorganisms.

asepsis

(ə-sĕp′sĭs, ā-)
n.
1. The state of being free of pathogenic microorganisms.
2. The process of removing pathogenic microorganisms or protecting against infection by such organisms.

asepsis

[āsep′sis]
Etymology: Gk, a, sepsis, not decay
1 the absence of germs.
2 medical asepsis, procedures used to reduce the number of microorganisms and prevent their spread. Examples include handwashing and "no touch" dressing technique.
3 surgical asepsis, procedures used to eliminate any microorganisms; sterile technique. An example is sterilization of surgical instruments. aseptic, adj.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility (q.v.).
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis

The complete absence of all bacteria or other microorganisms capable of causing infection. Asepsis, as distinct from antisepsis, is the concept that made modern surgery possible.

asepsis

without living pathogenic microorganisms or spores

asepsis (aˈ·sepˑ·sis),

n lack of germs and germ activity; sterile.

a·sep·sis

(ā-sep'sis)
A condition in which living pathogenic organisms are absent; a state of sterility.
[G. a- priv. + sēpsis, putrefaction]

asepsis (əsep´sis),

n the condition of being without infection; of being free of viable pathogenic microorganisms.
asepsis, chain of,
n a series of tasks, each step of which is performed in a bacteria-free environment, which serves to maintain the sterility of the entire process.

asepsis

absence of septic matter; freedom from infection or infectious material.

surgical asepsis
refers to destruction of organisms before they enter the body. It is used in caring for open wounds and in surgical procedures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Doug Haughs, a founding partner, is a microbiologist with 40 years experience in contamination control and Asepsis in pharmaceutical and medical diagnostics manufacturing.
Endogenous infections- In cases where insufficient asepsis is alleged, courts have expressed doubts about whether negligence in maintaining asepsis can explain the infection when its origin is endogenous.
The close of the 19th century saw triumphs of hospital reform and asepsis and seemed to herald the final victory over hospital cross-infection.
According to Charles Palenik, chairman of the board of directors for the Organization for Safety & Asepsis Procedures, the kill figures observed to date still don't qualify as sterilization, "so that will either have to improve, or the system will have to be used as a precleaning system, which would certainly be of value in the sterilization process.
Actually, with careful handing of the scope, asepsis could be achieved prior to the video camera.
The main scientific and medical changes which occurred were in the fields of anaesthesia, antisepsis and asepsis, microbiology and radiography - all areas which today form the basic foundations of modern health care.
The development of anesthesia and asepsis created salable hospital services and both FP and NP community hospitals sprang up.
Nurses adhered strictly to rituals of practice that they had learned by rote because they understood that "good nursing technique," which was based in scientific theories of asepsis, would reduce the possibility of error in an environment where mistakes could mean death or disability for patients.
The increasingly frenetic pace of change is perhaps illusory: 100 years ago, the world was being transformed by widespread provision of electric power, the telephone, the internal combustion engine, asepsis, new building materials like reinforced concrete, the re-alignment of the productive capacities of the Great Powers, psychiatry, the new physics, and huge gains in agricultural productivity in places like America and Australia.
It is clear that female circumcision, especially the more extensive procedures and especially those that are performed without asepsis or anesthesia, are physically harmful.