ascariasis

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ascariasis

 [as″kah-ri´ah-sis]
infection by the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides, seen in temperate and tropical regions of the world; it is common in the southern mountain region of the United States and is associated with poor sanitation such as when human feces is used as fertilizer. The Ascaris eggs develop into larvae in the soil and on growing plants on which feces have been deposited. When such vegetables are eaten without having been properly washed or cooked, live larvae are carried into the digestive system along with the food. Migrating from the intestines into the blood, then to the lungs and the esophagus, the larvae finally return to the intestines, where they grow to maturity, reaching a length ranging from 15 to 35 cm (6 to 14 in).

Ascaris infection may go unsuspected until a worm is passed in the stool. But there may be colic or other abdominal symptoms, and occasionally the worms are vomited during their passage through the esophagus. In children, “wandering worms” may emerge through the skin near the navel, and in adults, near the groin. Infected children usually are thin because the worms consume vital nutrients and inhibit the digestion of proteins. Loss of appetite and angioneurotic edema are common, and the face may be swollen.

Accurate diagnosis of the presence and extent of Ascaris infection usually depends on the detection of eggs in a stool sample examined microscopically. Treatment involves the use of medications such as mebendazole or pyrantel. to destroy and expel the parasites, and is completely successful in nearly every case. Prevention of Ascaris infection depends primarily on the sanitary disposal of human feces and discontinuing their use as fertilizer. Also important are the thorough washing of hands before food is prepared, and the careful cleaning and cooking of possibly infected foods.

as·ca·ri·a·sis

(as'kă-rī'ă-sis), Do not confuse this word with acariasis.
Disease caused by infection with Ascaris or related ascarid nematodes.
[G. askaris, an intestinal worm, + -iasis, condition]

ascariasis

/as·ca·ri·a·sis/ (as″kah-ri´ah-sis) infection with the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides. After ingestion, the larvae migrate first to the lungs then to the intestine.

ascariasis

(ăs′kə-rī′ə-sĭs)
n.
Infestation with or disease caused by the parasitic roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides.

ascariasis

[as′kərī′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, askaris, intestinal worm, osis, condition
the most common parasitic infection in the world, caused by a parasitic worm, Ascaris lumbricoides, that migrates through the lungs in its larval stage. The eggs are passed in human feces, contaminating the soil and allowing transmission to the mouths of others through hands, water, or food. After hatching in the small intestine, the larvae travel through the wall of the intestine and are carried by the lymphatics and blood to the lungs. Early respiratory symptoms of coughing, wheezing, hemoptysis, and fever are caused by the passage through the respiratory tract. The larvae are swallowed; they mature in the jejunum, where they release eggs; and the cycle is repeated. Intestinal infection may result in abdominal cramps and obstruction. In children infection may cause stunted growth; migration of the adult worms into a child's liver, gallbladder, or peritoneal cavity may cause death. The infective eggs are readily identified in the feces. Piperazine citrate, pyrantel pamoate, mebendazole, and albendazole are effective treatments. The disease can be prevented by educating people, especially children, about good hygiene such as handwashing.

ascariasis

Infestation by the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides.
Epidemiology Infection occurs after ingesting eggs in contaminated food or, more commonly, is carried to mouth by the hands after contact with contaminated soil. After an early pulmonary phase (larval migration), worms stay in the intestine.
Clinical findings Often asymptomatic.
Clinical findings, larval migration to lungs Wheezing, cough, chest pain, dyspnoea, pneumonitis at time of transpulmonary migration.
Clinical findings, larval migration elsewhere Conjunctivitis, fever, seizures, rash.
Clinical findings with mature worms Abdominal colic, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, anal pruritus, weight loss, diarrhoea, malabsorption.
Management Mebendazole, piperazine.

ascariasis

Infectious disease Infection by a nematode, Ascaris lumbricoides Epidemiology Infection occurs after ingesting eggs in contaminated food or more commonly, carried to mouth by hands after contact with contaminated soil; after an early pulmonary phase–larval migration, worms stay in the intestine Clinical Asymptomatic; pneumonitis at time of transpulmonary migration; diarrhea, abdominal colic Management Mebendazole, pyrantel pamoate

as·ca·ri·a·sis

, ascaridiasis , ascaridosis , ascariosis (askă-rīă-sis, -ri-dīă-sis, -ri-dōsis, -rē-ōsis)
A disease caused by infection with Ascaris or related ascarid nematodes.
[G. askaris, an intestinal worm, + -iasis, condition]

ascariasis

Infestation with the roundworm Ascaris lumbricoides which lives, often in considerable numbers, in the small intestine.

ascariasis (asˈ·k·rīˑ··sis),

n an infection caused by the common parasitic roundworm
Ascaris lumbricoides. Symptoms include temporary cough, labored respiration, wheezing, distension, and discomfort in the abdomen and sporadic vomiting. In rare cases, the infected individual may develop a blockage in the intestines.

ascariasis

infection with Ascaris spp. The disease affects pigs, principally the young. Signs include poor growth, poor coat and diarrhea due to enteritis. Migration by the larvae results in the development of hepatitis and pneumonia. Other less common sequelae include biliary duct obstruction and a severe interstitial pneumonia when atypical larvae, e.g. Ascaris suis, infect cattle.