arytenoid


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arytenoid

 [ar″ĭ-te´noid]
shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage or arytenoid muscle of the larynx.

ar·y·te·noid

(ar'i-tē'noyd), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.
[see arytenoideus]

arytenoid

/ar·y·te·noid/ (ar″ĭ-te´noid) shaped like a jug or pitcher, as arytenoid cartilage.

arytenoid

(ăr′ĭ-tē′noid′, ə-rĭt′n-oid′)
n.
1. Either of two small pitcher-shaped cartilages at the back of the larynx to which the vocal cords are attached.
2. A muscle connected to either of these cartilages.
3. Any of several small mucous glands located in front of these cartilages.
adj.
Of or relating to these cartilages or an associated muscle or gland.

ar′y·te·noi′dal adj.

arytenoid

adjective Ladle-shaped.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA]
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

Ladle-shaped. Pertaining to the two small cartilages attached to the vocal cords at the back of the LARYNX or to the arytenoid muscles of the larynx. From the Greek arutaina , a pitcher or ladle, and eidos , like.

ar·y·te·noid

(ari-tēnoyd) [TA] Avoid the mispronunciations a'rytenoid and aryt'enoid.
Denoting a cartilage (arytenoid cartilage) and muscles (oblique and transverse arytenoid muscles) of the larynx.

arytenoid

shaped like a jug or pitcher, as the arytenoid cartilage.

arytenoid abscess
see laryngeal chondritis.
arytenoid cartilage
one of the paired laryngeal cartilages in the dorsal part of the larynx that provides attachment for the muscles that adduct and abduct the vocal cords. The cartilages form the dorsal boundary of the rima glottis, the vocal cords the ventral boundary.
arytenoid chondritis
inflammation of the arytenoid cartilage that causes a syndrome similar to that caused by recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis.
arytenoid lateralization
a surgical technique used to treat laryngeal paralysis in dogs. One or both arytenoid cartilages are fixed in a lateral position with sutures, thereby enlarging the diameter of the laryngeal lumen.
References in periodicals archive ?
We recorded TT impingement on the epiglottis (Figure 1), right arytenoid (Figure 2), left arytenoid (Figure 3), interarytenoid tissue (Figure 4) and in the left pyriform fossa (Figure 5).
Fiberoptic laryngoscopy showed severe edema of the left arytenoid region (figure 3, B).
The hypobranchial eminence becomes the epiglottis and 2nd & 3rd eminences develop into arytenoids.
Arytenoid cartilage dislocation is an uncommon entity that is frequently misdiagnosed as vocal fold paresis or paralysis.
9) Their patient was a 62-year-old woman who had swallowed a fish bone, which then became stuck in her right cricoarytenoid joint and prevented rotation of her arytenoid cartilage.
Differentiation between an arytenoid dislocation and nerve injury can be difficult in these instances, and diagnosis usually is made with the aid of laryngeal examination, laryngeal electromyography, and computed tomography scanning.
AS involves axial skeleton but peripheral joints including TMJ and arytenoid cartilages may also be affected making tracheal intubation impossible1.
An insufficient view of the surgical site, anterior commissure involvement in the craniocaudal direction (T2), invasion of the posterior paraglottic space with arytenoid fixation, massive infiltration of the pre-epiglottic space, and the presence of minor thyroid cartilage erosion (T3) are the most controversial situations with regard to the use of TLM in glottic and supraglottic cancers (24).
During inhale, the glottis tends to widen by the removal of arytenoid cartilages due to the tracheal traction resulting from lung expansion [27].
It stretches from the end of the hard palate caudally over the epiglottis to the level of arytenoid cartilage.
Disruption of the endolaryngeal structures including the vocal cord attachments, arytenoid cartilages and mucosal epithelial lining itself also interfere with laryngeal function.