artificial sweetener


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artificial sweetener

Any of a group of substances with a taste similar to the usual dietary sugars, glucose and sucrose that are metabolised incompletely or not at all, resulting in a minimal gain of calories.
References in periodicals archive ?
Natural sweeteners are gaining importance due to their side effects-free property as compared to artificial sweeteners, which are produced through chemical processes and taste similar to sugar, but at present their market share is less than 5% and has huge growth potential.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT II-49 New Research Ties Consumption of Artificial Sweeteners to Reduced Appetite II-49 Artificial Sweeteners in Beverages: Research Studies Raise Concerns II-49 Select Studies on Artificially Sweetened Beverages Consumption and Associated Health Risks II-50 Aspartame Free from Cancer Odds II-51 Artificial Sweeteners May Not Aid Weight Loss in the Long Run II-51 Artificial Sweeteners Can Lead to Overeating II-51 Cause for Sweetener 'Aftertaste' Disclosed II-52 No Link Between Candy Consumption and Hyperactivity II-52 Regulatory Considerations II-52 Regulations in the United States II-52 European Union (EU) Regulations II-53 Sweeteners II-53 European Commission Re-Investigates Aspartame II-54 Regulations in the United Kingdom II-54
In a small study, the researchers analyzed the sweetener in 17 severely obese people who do not have diabetes and don't use artificial sweeteners regularly.
Artificial sweeteners only work when consumers don't "overcompensate.
The Artificial Sweeteners For Consumers World Report , a separate research from the two mentioned above, gives data and information on market consumption / products / services for over 200 countries by 6 to 10-digit NAICS product codes as well as by 3 time series from 1997- 2015 and forecasts for 2016- 2023 & 2023-2028.
They checked those results against 125 controls who were referred for Hashimoto's work-up but turned out to be antibody negative; 15 (12%) regularly used artificial sweeteners, 110 (88%) did not.
Artificial sweeteners -- promoted as aids to weight loss and diabetes prevention -- could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease, and they do so in a surprising way: by changing the composition and function of the gut microbiota -- the substantial population of bacteria residing in our intestines.
If you've suffered reactions to food/drink containing artificial sweeteners, I'd like to hear from you.
An excellent workaround is to bake with artificial sweetener.
Marco Scheurer, one of the study's co-authors, said: "Due to the use of artificial sweeteners as food additives, the occurrence of artificial sweetener traces in the aquatic environment might be a primary issue for consumer acceptance.
4 per cent of glucose (a form of carbohydrate) and compared the results with those for a drink containing the artificial sweetener saccharin.
We have also published articles with warnings about the artificial sweetener aspartame, being sold as NutraSweet[R], Spoonful[R], and Equal[R].