articulators


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ar·tic·u·la·tors

(ahr-tik'yŭ-lā-tŏrz)
Organs of the speech mechanism that form the configurations required for production of meaningful speech sounds, i.e., the teeth, lips, mandible, tongue, velum, and pharynx.
See also: speech mechanism
References in periodicals archive ?
These properties may reflect cortical strategies to greatly simplify the complex coordination of articulators in fluent speech," said Kristofer Bouchard, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Chang lab who was the first author on the paper.
The neurological basis of speech motor control has remained unknown until now because scientists cannot study speech mechanisms in animals and because non-invasive imaging methods lack the ability to resolve the very rapid time course of articulator movements, which change in hundredths of seconds.
The author of this article remarks on the "traditional subjectivist doctrine of the scholastics" and credits Saravia and his contemporary, Diego de Covarrubias (1512-1577) with being two of its most important articulators.
These midlife regime articulators struggle to innovate within a political environment where the governing party's cohesiveness cannot be taken for granted.
But California's intellectuals also contributed to the development of a paradigm of knowledge--in effect an intellectual master plan--that firmly marginalized women and minorities as articulators of official knowledge.
Signed and spoken languages differ in the main articulators used for linguistic expression.
First, nonarticulating firms may become articulators at a similar rate to firms becoming nonarticulators.
Malcolm X, whom Massingale described as "one of the most influential articulators of the African-American experience in the latter part of the 20th century," essentially dismissed Christianity as a failed, white man's religion.
Master Articulators Rural community colleges are transfer institutions; they award large numbers of degrees to BAA-seeking students * Associate degrees awarded, 2007 Urban: 29% (117,247) Suburban: 28% (117,117) Rural: 43% (178,008) Rural-Large 18% (74,215) Rural-Medium 21% (87,003) Rural-Small 4% (16,790) * King of the Hill Most (553 or 64%) of the 860 community college districts are rural: All Rural, suburban and urban district = 860 Suburban: 23% (195) Urban: 13% (112) Rural-Serving districts = 553 Rural: 64% (553) Rural-Large 13% (110) Rural-Medium 35% (303) Rural-Small 16% (140) SOURCE: EDUCATION POLICY INSTITUTE, UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Note: Table made from pie chart.
Specific speech sounds are produced by moving the articulators (cheeks, lips, teeth, palate, tongue, and jaw) to shape the vocal tract and the airstream in characteristic ways.
Chapter six, "Singing as Communication: Mapping the Structures of Articulation (Zeller)," examines mapping articulators: the tongue, jaw, velum or soft plate as articulators as opposed to resonators as was done in chapter five.
The issue of cultural appropriation--the authorized or unauthorized "use of something developed in one cultural context by someone who belongs to another culture" (Young 5)--also plagues cosmopolitanism's articulators.