articulation


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Related to articulation: articulation disorder

articulation

 [ahr-tik″u-la´shun]
1. any place of junction between two different parts or objects.
2. enunciation of words and sentences.

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ar-tik'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): joint
2. A joining or connecting together loosely to allow motion between parts.
3. Distinct, coherent, connected speech or enunciation.
4. In dentistry, the contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
[see articulatio]

articulation

/ar·tic·u·la·tion/ (-la´shun)
1. a joint or place of junction between two different parts or objects.
2. enunciation of words and sentences.
3. in dentistry: (a) the contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth while in action; (b) the arrangement of artificial teeth so as to accommodate the various positions of the mouth and to serve the purpose of the natural teeth which they are to replace.

articulation

(är-tĭk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. The act of vocal expression; utterance or enunciation: an articulation of the group's sentiments.
2.
a. The act or manner of producing a speech sound.
b. A speech sound, especially a consonant.
3. Anatomy
a. A fixed or movable joint between bones.
b. A movable joint between inflexible parts of the body of an animal, as the divisions of an appendage in arthropods.

ar·tic′u·la·to′ry (-lə-tôr′ē), ar·tic′u·la′tive (-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv) adj.

articulation

1 the process by which the supraglottal airway is shaped to form consonants and vowels into meaningful, understandable speech.
2 See joint.

articulation

Anatomy Joint The point where two bones meet via a cartilaginous bridge,
Speech pathology The physical movements made by the speech organs (mouth, tongue and throat) in verbal communication.
Vox populi The coherency and clarity of expression.

articulation

Neurology 
1. Speech.
2. The ability to produce intelligible speech, through the appropriate interaction of the lips, tongue and palate.

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ahr-tik'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): joint.
2. A juncture or connection that permits motion between parts.
3. The process of coordinating movement of oral, laryngeal, and pharyngeal structures to produce speech.
4. dentistry The contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
See also: synovial joint
[L. a forming of vines]

articulation

A joint.

articulation

see JOINT.

articulation

the (usually movable) apposition of two or more bones (see joint)
  • cartilaginous articulation cartilaginous union of two apposed bones; see symphysis synchondrosis; tarsal coalitions

  • fibrous articulation fibrous union of two adjacent bones; there is no interposed joint cavity, and only minimal interbone movement is available; see suture; syndesmosis

  • synovial articulation a freely moving joint in which apposing bone surfaces are capped by hyaline or fibrocartilage and lined by synovial membrane

articulation,

n 1. a juncture between two bones that moves.
2. a massage technique in which a joint is passively moved, repetitively, through its range of motion.

ar·tic·u·la·tion

(ahr-tik'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, the contact relationship of the occlusal surfaces of the teeth during jaw movement.
2. Synonym(s): joint.
3. A joining or connecting together loosely to allow motion between parts.
[L. a forming of vines]

articulation (ärtik´yōōlā´shən),

n 1. a joint where the bones are joined together. See also joint.
n 2. the relationship of cusps of teeth during jaw movement.
articulation, anatomic,
n a rigid or movable junction of a bony part.
articulation, articulator,
n the use of a device that incorporates artificial temporomandibular joints that permit the orientation of casts in a manner duplicating or simulating various positions or movements of the mandible.
articulation, balanced,
n the simultaneous contacting of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as they glide over each other when the mandible is moved from centric relation to the various eccentric relations. See also occlusion, balanced.
articulation, mandibular,
n See articulation, temporomandibular.
articulation, temporomandibular
n (temporomandibular joint, mandibular joint), 1. the joint formed by the two condyles of the mandible.
n 2. the bilateral articulation between the glenoid or mandibular fossae of the temporal bones and condyles (condyloid processes) of the mandible.
articulation, temporomandibular, capsule,
n the ligamentous covering of the temporomandibular joint.
articulation, temporomandibular, collagen disease,
n a rheumatoid arthritis in which the joint may be so involved because of bone changes that the mandibular condyle is fused to the articular fossa in the base of the cranium.
articulation, temporomandibular, hormonal disturbances,
n.pl hormonal disorders that frequently affect growth patterns of the skeleton, involving the temporomandibular joint (e.g., acromegaly).
articulation, temporomandibular, neuromuscular disorders,
n.pl neuromuscular disorders involving the temporomandibular joint in which the patient is unable to maintain appropriate patterns of mandibular closure consistent with good dental occlusion. The natural teeth degenerate rapidly and are frequently lost prematurely; when dentures are substituted, they cause the residual tissues to deteriorate rapidly. In addition to the chronic masticatory disability, the deglutitive mechanism functions poorly because of incoordinated lip and tongue action.
articulation, temporomandibular, pain-dysfunction syndrome,

articulation

a joint; the place of union or junction between two or more bones of the skeleton.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather surprisingly, articulation time correlates significantly with every memory measure.
The transfer-articulation status of the two-year programs at these schools puts to the test the working assumption that having a designated two-year program advocate on the same campus as four-year academic leaders necessarily eases intra-institutional articulation and transfer.
Most of primary school first graders had proper articulation (49%), whereas substitution and substitution associated with distortion was recorded in only 6% of the study sample.
Statewide Policy: Legislatures and higher education systems adopt articulation policies at the state level.
Family history data included information on the genetic connection between parents (whether parents are relatives or not) and the presence of any nuclear (parents, sisters, and brothers) or extended (uncles, aunts, cousins, and grandparents) relative that has/had an articulation disorder.
Both performers must have accurate articulation, rhythm and dynamics.
Articulation I - Pre operative casts (reference group): Maxillary and mandibular preoperative impres- sions were made with polyvinyl siloxane impression material (Aquasil, Dentslpy).
High-school-to-community-college articulation agreements can be traced back to one forward-thinking Kentucky congressman, Carl D.
The importance of appreciating that the "childhood imprinting factor" forms an insidious and often overlooked trap in the articulation of other languages cannot be overemphasized.
Exhibit 1 suggests that there has been little change in the shape of the distribution of nonarticulation, yet exhibit 2 shows a significant decline in articulation among firms that did articulate at one point in time.
Bridgepoint Education Inc (NYSE:BPI), a provider of post-secondary education services stated on Monday that new articulation agreements with colleges in the state of Wyoming has been signed by Ashford University.
The Oklahoma Health Care Workforce Center's Sub-Committee on Articulation has been meeting quarterly for almost two years to assess progress on allied health and nursing articulation and devise plans to improve the process.

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